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ARTICLE
Year : 1966  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 89-90

Role of non-specific protein therapy, (milk injection) in cataract surgery


Department of Ophthalmology, College of Medical Sciences, B.H.U. Varanasi, India

Date of Web Publication12-Jan-2008

Correspondence Address:
K S Mehra
Department of Ophthalmology, College of Medical Sciences, B.H.U. Varanasi
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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How to cite this article:
Mehra K S, Khare B B, Rajyashree K. Role of non-specific protein therapy, (milk injection) in cataract surgery. Indian J Ophthalmol 1966;14:89-90

How to cite this URL:
Mehra K S, Khare B B, Rajyashree K. Role of non-specific protein therapy, (milk injection) in cataract surgery. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 1966 [cited 2019 May 20];14:89-90. Available from: http://www.ijo.in/text.asp?1966/14/2/89/38570

Table 1

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Table 1

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Non-specific protein therapy, given I.M. or I.V., has been used for treat­ment for uveitis. Mild degree of post­operative keratitis or iritis (as noted on the first dressing done after 24 to 28 hours) was seen after cataract extrac­tion; the degree of which varied from patient to patient. Milk injection given intramuscularly after cataract extrac­tion, reduce the post-operative iritis and keratitis.

So we wondered how would the eye react post-operatively if milk injection were given about 16-24 hours earlier to operation.


  Materials and Methods Top


With this view in mind, we divided our cataract patients to be operated on every operation day in two groups.

Group A: In cases under this group, milk injection of 3-5cc was given in­tramuscularly. The strength of the injection was considered according to the body weight of the patients. They were injected 14-18 hours before the operation. In group B cases, no milk injection was given; otherwise the pre­operative preparation for cases includ­ed in both groups was same.

On the first post-operative dressing which was done after 48 hours, the degree of ciliary flush and keratitis along the section were noted and the criteria for the degree of post-operative ciliary flush and keratitis were as fol­lows:-

1st degree -- ciliary flush absent: keratitis absent.

2nd degree -ciliary flush + , kera­titis absent.

3rd degree -ciliary flush + + , small degree of kera­titis present.

4th degree-ciliary flush +++, marked degree of keratitis present.

In each group of A and B. 100 patients were operated; the results of the first post-operative dressing were found to be as follows:-[Table - 1]

Thus, it was seen that post-operative ciliary flush and keratitis were much less in group A in comparison to group B.


  Discussion Top


Various explanations have been given as to how this injection of foreign protein helps in the course of inflam­mation. It is said that foreign proteins stimulate adrenal cortex and thus there is an increase in production of endogenous corticosteroids. Sayer's and Sayer's have confirmed this theory on animals. Activity of adrenal cortex is judged by the amount of excretion of 17. Keto-steroids in urine and Rosen has shown that there is an increase in 17 keto-steroids in urine after protein injections. According to Wood, this non-specific protein therapy has an im­portant role in the treatment of localis­ed eye inflammation. As we all know. steroids do not directly act on ocular tissue but only reduce the degree of reaction of tissues to an exciting agent thereby diminishing hyper sensitivity and inflammation.

Thus, the release of corticosteroids after non-specific protein therapy, in­hibit development of iritis and keratitis. Therefore, when milk injection was given intramuscularly before cataract operation, presumably the degree of post-operative iritis and keratitis was much less and the post-operative pe­riod of such patients was smooth.

For ocular diseases, either boiled fresh cow's milk or proprietary milk preparations were used for this therapy.


  Summary and Conclusion Top


1. 100 patients of cataract extractions were given intramuscular injection (non-specific protein therapy ), 3-5 cc varying according to the weight of the patients, 18 hours before the operation while in the other group of 100 patients; no milk injection was given.

2. The degree of post-operative ciliary flush (iritis) and keratitis was noted in both the groups on the first post­operative dressing.

3. Those patients who were given milk injections before operation showed much less degree of ciliary flush and keratitis in comparison to those who were not given milk in­jections.[2]

 
  References Top

1.
Rosen. D. A. (1952), Amer. J. Oohth. 35: 1783.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Sayer's and Sayer's M. A. (1949). The pituitary adrenal system. Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 50: 522.  Back to cited text no. 2
    



 
 
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