Glyxambi
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 990
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page

   Table of Contents      
ARTICLES
Year : 1981  |  Volume : 29  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 37-38

Herpes zoster ophthalmicus in children


Dr. Rajendra Prasad Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences A.I.I.M.S., New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Anita Panda
Dr. R. P. Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, A.I.I.M.S. New Delhi-110029
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 6269994

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Panda A, Sood N N, Dayal Y, Bhatia I M. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus in children. Indian J Ophthalmol 1981;29:37-8

How to cite this URL:
Panda A, Sood N N, Dayal Y, Bhatia I M. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus in children. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 1981 [cited 2019 Dec 11];29:37-8. Available from: http://www.ijo.in/text.asp?1981/29/1/37/30989

It is caused by a neurotropic virus which is identical to varicella virus. It is very uncom­mon under the age of 30 years.[1] Although it is uncommon during childhood however cases have been reported at various ages and even in a twenty hours old infant[2],[3],[4],[5],[6],[7].

The purpose of this paper is to document two cases of Herpes zoster ophthalmicus in a 3 year old boy who developed the episode during an epidemic of varicella and a 4 year old girl who had suffered from varicella in recent past.

Cash Report 1

S. K. a three year old boy was brought to the casualty deptt, with the complaints of severe pain on the left side of the forehead of 4 days' duration. This was followed by swelling of both lids along with appearance of vesicles over the forehead, upper and lower lids, as well as root and tip of nose on the left side, also associated with profuse lacrimation and photophobia.

There was history of an outbreak of vari­cella in the locality.

The child was well nourished for his age free from any other illness. The lids were so much oedematous that it was not possible to open the eye even with retractors. There was impairment of corneal sensation, along with punctate keratitis and iritis. The patient was admitted and treated with systemic and local antibiotics on the vesicles [Figure - 1]. The local steroids and atropine were applied in the conj­unctival culdesac and after 12 days the con­dition improved considerably.

Case No. 2

Patient S., 4 year old female child was presented, with the complaints of pain and vesicular eruptions on right side of face, eye lids, forehead and scalp along with swelling of right upper lid of three days duration.

The right upper lid was swollen with vesi­cles over the right half forehead, both the lids, right side and tip of the nose. Skin adjacent to eruption was oedematous. Bulbar conjunctiva was congested all other ocular structures were normal. The child had an episode of chicken pox in recent past.

The patient was treated with tab. Suganril and tab. Neurobion systemically. Calamine lotion was applied on vesicles. Atropine oint­ment and local corticosteroid drops were ins­tilled in conjunctiva culdesac for 3 days. As there was no relief of symptoms a short course of systemic corticosteroid 20 mg. daily was given. After 10 days the patient improved remarkably.


  Discussion Top


Though it is considered that Herpes zoster is uncommon under the age of 20 years[1], Birks found an incidence of 0.2% in children of age group 6-13 years.

It is well known fact that adults may suffer from Herpes zoster after attending on children with varicella. Children have also suffered from varicella when they have been in contact with adults with Herpes zoster[2],[8]. The rare occurrence in infants and children is due to the generally accepted fact that the same virus in children cause varicella and may be giving some im­munity against Herpes zoster ophthalmicus.


  Summary Top


Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus in two children aged 3 years and 4 years respectively are repor­ted. The first had contact with the patient of varicella and second had suffered from chicken pox in recent past.

 
  References Top

1.
Sorsby, A., 1973, Modern Ophthalmology Butterworth and Co. Ltd. 2nd edition.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Garrett, F.C., 1963, Amer. J. Ophthalmol.46 : 741.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Malik, S.R K., Sood, G.C., Gupta. S.B. and Gupta L).K., 1964, Orient. Arch. Ophthalmol. 2 : 92.   Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Sood, N.N., 1969, Orient. Arch. Ophthalmol.7:40.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Lal, K. 1970, Orient. Arch. Ophthalmol. 8:43.   Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Sarma, C.M., 1977, Philippine J. Ophthalmol.9:22  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Gupta, S. Soodan, S.S., Pahda, S.P. and Bali F.S., 1979, Ind. J. Ophthalmol. 26: 50.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Birks D.A., 1963, Brit. J.Ophthalmol. 47:60.  Back to cited text no. 8
    


    Figures

  [Figure - 1]



 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
Discussion
Summary
References
Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2052    
    Printed45    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded0    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal