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EDITORIAL
Year : 1989  |  Volume : 37  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1

Continuing medical education.


CBM Oph. Institute, Little Flower Hospital, Angamally-683 572 Kerala, India

Correspondence Address:
S T Fernandez
CBM Oph. Institute, Little Flower Hospital, Angamally-683 572 Kerala
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 2807491

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How to cite this article:
Fernandez S T. Continuing medical education. Indian J Ophthalmol 1989;37:1

How to cite this URL:
Fernandez S T. Continuing medical education. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 1989 [cited 2019 Oct 20];37:1. Available from: http://www.ijo.in/text.asp?1989/37/1/1/26114

The development of scientific knowledge is taking place in an explosive manner and many of the facts of yester-years are becoming obsolete today. Medicine is no exception.

Vast changes are occurring in pharmaco-dynamics, immunity, genetic engineering, bio-engineering and lasers in medicine. New-found disease like AIDS, new thoughts in the management and treatment of cancer are fields which remain beyond the comprehension of most of the general practitioners, but from the patient's point of view, they need the proper advice and guidance from him.

Changes are occurring in all specialities. In the case of ophthalmology, anterior segment microsurgery, intra­ocular implants, different lasers for ocular treatment, vitrectomy and peeling of pre-retinal membranes, in­tra-vitreal injection of gas and silicon are all changes that have occurred in the last two decades or so.

For a busy practitioner, to keep pace with these developments are difficult. Some unfortunately do not come to know of these developments. In the western countries therefore, attending seminars and workshops has become compulsory and renewing the medical license once in two or three years after passing an examination has been introduced as a procedure.

Is it not time, we also think on such lines? Perhaps writing examinations will be difficult, especially for the old medical practitioners.

Every day, new drugs arc introduced in the market. The source of information on these drugs are the medical representatives. They will naturally be interested in selling their products; so the good effects of these drugs are over emphasised and the bad effects suppressed. But the doctors should critically review, cautiously evaluate and watchfully follow the drug effect in all patients and should report their bad effects, if any, for the benefit of the patients and fellow colleagues. To do so, a basic knowledge of these drugs is necessary. Therefore, the Medical Council of India should ponder over the following suggestion :­

1) It should be mandatory to renew the registration once in three years.

2) For applying for registration, the doctors must be asked to produce a certificate that they have attended at least one refresher course in a year on the speciality they are practising. All those above the age of 55 years can be exempted from attending such courses.

3) The Medical Council should inspect, review, evaluate and then give recognition to these courses and authorize organizers to issue certificates. Both Government and private institutions should encourage the doctors to attend such refresher courses. The Government employees should be paid TA and DA at the existing rates, with official leave. TA and DA of the private practitioners must be exempted from Income tax.

The Indian Medical Association and other specialist societies should take up the matter with the Government and the Medical Council to implement these recommendations. These courses will update the practitioners in their knowledge and will benefit the patients vastly. The society will be healthier and safer in the hands of those who try to keep up with modern developments.

Knowledge is like a tree. To enjoy its fruits, we have to water, manure, and prune it. Let us strive to do that.




 

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