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   Table of Contents      
ARTICLES
Year : 1989  |  Volume : 37  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 96-97

Ocular findings in the inmates of a leprosy rehabilitation centre


School of Eye Health Appraisal Programme, TheTarabai Desai Eye Hospital, E-22, Shastri Nagar, Jodhpur-342 001., India

Correspondence Address:
Desai Sanjiv
School of Eye Health Appraisal Programme, TheTarabai Desai Eye Hospital, E-22, Shastri Nagar, Jodhpur-342 001.
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 2583793

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  Abstract 

This study is aimed at presenting the profile of ocular lesions observed in the inmates of a leprosy rehabilitation centre. Corneal involvement was found to be the highest (52.7%), followed by lesions of the eyebrows (47.3%) and eyelids (30.9%), uveal tract involvement (18.1%) and chronic conjunctivitis (1.8%).


How to cite this article:
Sanjiv D, Rajiv D, Desai N C, Shoba L, Kumar K. Ocular findings in the inmates of a leprosy rehabilitation centre. Indian J Ophthalmol 1989;37:96-7

How to cite this URL:
Sanjiv D, Rajiv D, Desai N C, Shoba L, Kumar K. Ocular findings in the inmates of a leprosy rehabilitation centre. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 1989 [cited 2020 Jul 9];37:96-7. Available from: http://www.ijo.in/text.asp?1989/37/2/96/26078

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Table 3

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Table 2

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Table 2

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Table 1

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Table 1

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  Introduction Top


Leprosy being a chronic disease and having considerable so­cial stigma, the general trend is to isolate cases of the disease in rehabilitation centres for proper therapy. The Gandhi Kush­tha Ashram is such a centre at Jodhpur. As part of the com­munity oriented eye care projects of our institution, we took it upon ourselves to conduct a two week, comprehensive eye care programme at this centre to treat ocular problems. This communication presents the ocular profile observed in these individuals.


  Material and Methods Top


At the Gandhi Kushtha Ashram 85 inmates were examined. Of these 55 were leprosy afficited adults taking anti-leprosy medication, for the past 5 to 13 years. The age and sex dis­tribution of the inmates is described in [Table - 1]. There were 30 children with age ranging from 6 months to 14 years. Com­plete ocular examination was done in all cases including slit lamp biomicroscopy and ophthalmoscopy. Medical treatment was carried out under our supervision and cataract cases were operated upon. Orientation classes as to ocular hygiene and care of eyes related to leprotic ocular magnifestation were conducted. Nutrition education was also imparted at the camp and elements of nutritive cooking taught by way of a cooking contest using available DGLV and other Vitamin A rich food stuffs grown by the inmates at the centre itself.


  Observation Top


[Table - 1] depicts the age and sex distribution of the popula­tion treated.

[Table - 2] depicts the various ocular lesions of leprosy ob­served in inmates of the Gandhi Kushtha Ashram.

[Table - 3] depicts the non-specific ocular lesions observed in the inmates.

[Table - 4] depicts the causes of blindness in inmates of the Rehabilitation centre.


  Discussion Top


In the present study total prevalence of ocular manifestations of leprosy was found to be 78.18 percent. This is comparable to the report of Chatterjee et al (83.65 percent) [1] and Lamba et al(87.3 percent) [2] None of the inmates children suffered from leprosy or had any of its ocular manifestations.

The cornea was found to be the most commonly affected (52.7 percent) ocular structure. Reddy et al [3] reported involvement of the cornea in 63.1% and Chatterjee et all in 73.03% cases. In the present series corneal involvement is probably not due to lagophthalmos. Among corneal lesions, impaired corneal sensation occupies top echelon (72.4%) which is comparable to the study of Chatterjee et al who reported it in 49.8% and absence of corneal sensation in 15.32%. Exprosure keratitis was present in 13.7% of cases and corneal opacity in 6.8% of cases.

Eyebrows and eyelids were next in frequency of involvement with a prevalance of 47.3% and 30.9% respectively. These figure are quite high as compared to Chatterjee et all who reported involvement of the eyebrows in 3.83% and eyelids inn 16.09%. This is probably due to higher number of cases of lepromatous leprosy included in the present series. The uveal tract was involved in 18.1% of our cases. Agarwal and Gupta4 reported 11.9% and Reddy3 et al 17.7% of uveal in­volvement which are comparable to our figures.

Complicated cataract and chronic conjunctivitis was found in 3.6% and 1.8% respectively. Other ocular manifestations are listed in [Table - 2].

Blindness due to leprosy was found in 6.3% of cases, Chat­terjee et al [1] reported blindess inn 4.2% cases and Radhakrish­nan et al [5] in 14 percent.

After making these observations we are convinced that if an integrated approach is taken by the dermatologist and the oph­thalmologist and the eye examine regularly after the first diag­nosis of leprosy and ocular lesions treated at there earliest, the severity and course of ocular complications and the incidence of blindness can be reduced to a great extent.

 
  References Top

1.
Chatterjee P.R., Sinha S.M., Baidya B.K., Chatopadhyay D.N., Son Gupta S.K., X Congress APAO, 859-862,1985.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Lambs P.A., Kumar D.S; Ind. J. Oph. 32-61,1984.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Reddy S.C., Raju B.D; Acharya N.R.; B: Leper India, 53:231, 1981.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Agarwal M.C., Gupta G.D.: X Congress APAO, 855-858,1985.   Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Radhakrishnsn N, Albert S.: Ind. J. Ophthal 28:19,1980.  Back to cited text no. 5
    



 
 
    Tables

  [Table - 1], [Table - 2], [Table - 3], [Table - 4]



 

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Abstract
Introduction
Material and Methods
Observation
Discussion
References
Article Tables

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