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   Table of Contents      
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2006  |  Volume : 54  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 139

Masquerade lesions of the orbit and adnexa


1 Oculoplastic and Paediatric Ophthalmology Services, Dr. Rajendra Prasad Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
2 Ocular Pathology Services, Dr. Rajendra Prasad Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
M S Bajaj
Oculoplastic and Paediatric Ophthalmology Services, Dr. Rajendra Prasad Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0301-4738.25841

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How to cite this article:
Pushker N, Bajaj M S, Chaturvedi A, Sen S, Kashyap S. Masquerade lesions of the orbit and adnexa. Indian J Ophthalmol 2006;54:139

How to cite this URL:
Pushker N, Bajaj M S, Chaturvedi A, Sen S, Kashyap S. Masquerade lesions of the orbit and adnexa. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 2006 [cited 2019 Oct 19];54:139. Available from: http://www.ijo.in/text.asp?2006/54/2/139/25841

Dear Editor,

We read with keen interest, the recently published article on periocular dirofilariasis, masquerading as a lid tumor.[1] We would like to share with the readers some of our experiences relevant to the subject, which may help in better management of such cases.

At our centre, we have encountered and reported numerous patients in whom, an infectious lesion masqueraded as an ocular[2] or adnexal[3],[4] tumor. In a majority of cases, the presentation was that of a necrotizing eyelid mass, which on clinical examination closely resembled a tumor. However, on biopsy, the histopathology revealed a fungal etiology caused by fungi such as aspergillus, histoplasma and fusarium. Even indolent conditions affecting the orbit and adnexa, such as tuberculosis, mucormycosis and cysticercosis,[5] may occasionally mimic a malignancy. Routine imaging may often prove inconclusive in clinching the diagnosis.

We would like to reiterate, that it is imperative to establish a tissue diagnosis in all such cases prior to deciding on the final course of management, as most of these conditions are amenable to medical therapy or a limited surgical resection. Therefore, a radical surgical intervention, which may require extensive reconstruction and lead to increased patient morbidity, can be avoided.

 
  References Top

1.
Mahesh G, Giridhar A, Biswas J, Saikumar SJ, Bhat A. A case of periocular dirofilariasis masquerading as a lid tumour. Indian J Ophthalmol 2005;53:63-4.   Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]  
2.
Bajaj MS, Pushker N, Kulkarni A, Kashyap S, Purohit A. Prolapsed intraocular aspergilloma masquerading as malignant melanoma. Indian J Ophthalmol 2003;51:255-7.   Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]  
3.
Pushker N, Chandra M, Bajaj MS, Ghose S, Naik N, Kashyap S, et al. Necrotizing periorbital Fusarium infection-an emerging pathogen in immunocompetent individuals. J Infect 2002;44:236-9.   Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Sen S, Bajaj MS, Vijayaraghavan M. Histoplasmosis of the eyelids-a case report. Indian J Pathol Microbiol 1999;42:495-7.   Back to cited text no. 4
[PUBMED]    
5.
Pushker N, Bajaj MS, Betharia SM. Orbital and adnexal cysticercosis. Clin Exp Ophthalmol 2002;30:322-33 Rev.   Back to cited text no. 5
[PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]  




 

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