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SYMPOSIUM
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 57  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 45-49

Small incision cataract surgery: Complications and mini-review


Departments of Pediatric Ophthalmology, Community Eye Care, H.V. Desai Eye Hospital, Mohommadwadi, Hadapsar, Pune-411 028, India

Correspondence Address:
Parikshit M Gogate
Departments of Pediatric Ophthalmology, Community Eye Care, H.V. Desai Eye Hospital, Mohommadwadi, Hadapsar, Pune-411 028
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0301-4738.44512

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This article reviews the literature on manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) and its complications. Various articles on MSICS published in indexed journals were reviewed, as well as the sections on complications of MSICS. The Pubmed search engine on the Internet was used to find out articles published since 1985 on MSICS in any language in indexed journals. Books published by Indian authors and the website of Indian Journal of Ophthalmology were also referred to. MSICS has become very popular technique of cataract surgery in India, and it is often used as an alternative to phacoemulsification. Studies on its efficacy and safety for cataract surgery show that, being a variant of extracapsular cataract surgery, MSICS also has similar intraoperative and postoperative complications. The considerable handling inside the anterior chamber during nucleus delivery increase the chances of iris injury, striate keratitis, and posterior capsular rupture. The surgeon has to be extra careful in the construction of the scleral tunnel and to achieve a good capsulorrhexis. Postoperative inflammation and corneal edema are rare if surgeons have the expertise and patience. The final astigmatism is less than that in the extracapsular cataract surgery and almost comparable to that in phacoemulsification. There is, however, a concern of posterior capsular opacification in the long term, which needs to be addressed. Although MSICS demands skill and patience from the cataract surgeon, it is a safe, effective, and economical alternative to competing techniques and can be the answer to tackle the large backlog of blindness due to cataract.


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