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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 58  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 275-280

A bibliometric study of publications by Indian ophthalmologists and vision researchers, 2001-06


1 Library and Information Center, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India
2 National Institutes of Health Library, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
3 Microbiology Department, Aravind Eye Care System, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
R Kumaragurupari
Aravind Eye Hospital, Madurai
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0301-4738.64117

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Objective: The objective was to conduct a bibliometric analysis of Indian ophthalmic papers published from 2001 to 2006 in the peer-reviewed journals, to assess productivity, trends in journal choice, publication types, research funding, and collaborative research. Materials and Methods: We searched PubMed for articles indicating both vision-related content and author affiliation with an Indian research center. We identified research collaborations and funding from indexing for research support, and classified articles as reporting basic science, clinical science, or clinically descriptive research. Impact factors were determined from Journal Citation Reports for 2006. Results: The total number of published articles that were retrieved for the years 2001 to 2006 was 2163. During the six-year period studied, the annual output of research articles has nearly doubled, from 284 in 2001 to 460 in 2006. Two-thirds of these were published in international journals; 41% in vision-related journals with 2006 impact factors; and 3% in impact factor journals which were not vision-related. Fifty percent of the publications came from nine major eye hospitals. Clinical science articles were most frequently published whereas basic science the least. Publications resulting from international collaborations increased from 3% in 2001 to 8% in 2006. The focus of the journal with the highest number of publications corresponds to the most common cause of bilateral blindness in India, cataract. Conclusion: This bibliometric study of publications of research from India in the field of ophthalmic and vision research shows that research productivity, as measured in both the number of publications in peer-reviewed journals and qualitative measures of those journals, has increased during the period of this study.


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