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   Table of Contents      
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 59  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 169-170

Authors' reply


Department of Neuro-ophthalmology, Aravind Eye Hospital and Post Graduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Web Publication23-Feb-2011

Correspondence Address:
Mahesh Kumar
Aravind Eye Hospital, 1, Anna Nagar, Madurai - 625 020, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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How to cite this article:
Agarwal P, Kumar M, Arora V. Authors' reply. Indian J Ophthalmol 2011;59:169-70

How to cite this URL:
Agarwal P, Kumar M, Arora V. Authors' reply. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 2011 [cited 2020 May 29];59:169-70. Available from: http://www.ijo.in/text.asp?2011/59/2/169/77027

Dear Editor,

We are thankful to Nithyanandam [1] for keenly persuing our article. [2] We did not investigated all our patients straight away with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) because of cost constraints and other causes of disc edema which could be excluded initially with computed tomography (CT) scan alone. After excluding all other causes of disc edema by CT scan, the patients with presumed idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) (308) were evaluated with MRI and magnetic resonance venography (MRV). MRV was performed only when MRI was not supportive in diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST), or there was strong clinical suspicion of CVST due to associated risk factors, namely, male sex, nonobesity, postsurgery, use of oral contraceptives, deep vein thrombosis, and hypercoagulable states in the presence of normal MRI.

The main aim of the study was to report the rate of occurrence of CVST, highlighting the role of MRI and MRV in patients with presumed IIH. The visual loss in the cohort was not analyzed. We agree that all patients with CVT require regular monitoring of visual function, both central acuity and visual field analysis, to prevent/reduce irreversible visual loss.

 
  References Top

1.
Nithyanandam S, Joseph M, Mathew T. Clinical profile of cerebral venous thrombosis and the role of imaging in its diagnosis in patients with presumed idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Indian J Ophthalmol 2011;59:169.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
2.
Agarwal P, Kumar M, Arora V. Clinical profile of cerebral venous thrombosis and the role of imaging in its diagnosis in patients with presumed idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Indian J Ophthalmol 2010;58:153-5.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  




 

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