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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 59  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 211-214

Objective structured clinical examination for undergraduates: Is it a feasible approach to standardized assessment in India?


1 Department of Ophthalmology, Pad. Dr. D. Y. Patil Medical College, Dhankawadi, India
2 Medical Education Unit, Bharati Vidyapeeth University Medical College, Dhankawadi, India
3 Department of Community Medicine, Pad. Dr. D. Y. Patil Medical College, Pune, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Kavita R Bhatnagar
B4/21, Brahma Aangan, Off Salunke Vihar Road, Kondwa, Pune - 411 048, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0301-4738.81032

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Background: There has been a growing concern among medical educators about the quality of medical graduates trained in various medical colleges in our country. Data based on the faculty and student perceptions of undergraduate curriculum indicate a need for laying more stress on practical skills during their training and assessment. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is a reliable and an established and effective multistation test for the assessment of practical skills in an objective and a transparent manner. The aim of this article is to sensitize universities, examiners, organizers, faculty, and students across India to OSCE. Materials and Methods: We designed an assessment based on 22-station OSCE and administered it to 67 students during their final year, integrating all the domains of learning, that is higher order cognitive domain, psychomotor domain, and affective domain. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 15. Results: The OSCE was feasible to conduct and had high perceived construct validity. There was a significant correlation between the station score and total examination score for 19 stations. The reliability of this OSCE was 0.778. Both students and faculty members expressed a high degree of satisfaction with the format. Conclusion: Integrating a range of modalities into an OSCE in ophthalmology appears to represent a valid and reliable method of examination. The biggest limitation with this format was the direct expenditure of time and energy of those organizing an OSCE; therefore, sustaining the motivation of faculty might pose a challenge.


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