Glyxambi
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 984
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page

   Table of Contents      
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 60  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 243-244

Authors' reply


1 Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Aravind Eye Hospital and Postgraduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Tirunelveli, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Chief Medical Officer, Aravind Eye Hospital and Postgraduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Tirunelveli, Tamil Nadu, India
3 Department of General Ophthalmology, Aravind Eye Hospital and Postgraduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Tirunelveli, Tamil Nadu, India
4 Department of Cornea and Refractive Surgery, Aravind Eye Hospital and Postgraduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Tirunelveli, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Web Publication8-May-2012

Correspondence Address:
M Jayahar Bharathi
Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Aravind Eye Hospital and Postgraduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Tirunelveli - 627 001, Tamil Nadu
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Bharathi M J, Ramakrishnan R, Shivakumar C, Meenakshi R. Authors' reply. Indian J Ophthalmol 2012;60:243-4

How to cite this URL:
Bharathi M J, Ramakrishnan R, Shivakumar C, Meenakshi R. Authors' reply. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 2012 [cited 2019 Dec 10];60:243-4. Available from: http://www.ijo.in/text.asp?2012/60/3/243/95890

Dear Editor,

Thank you very much for your interest and your comments [1] on our article titled "Etiology and antibacterial susceptibility pattern of community-acquired bacterial ocular infections in a tertiary eye care hospital in South India."

This study was a retrospective analysis, [2] which included ocular samples submitted for microbiological evaluation, obtained from clinically diagnosed ocular infections such as blepharitis, conjunctivitis, internal and external hordeolum, suppurative scleritis, canaliculitis, keratitis, dacryocystitis, pre-septal and orbital cellulitis, blebitis, endophthalmitis, and panophthalmitis, between January 2002 and December 2007. Using standard techniques, the specimens were collected and subjected to culture and smear analysis. [3],[4],[5] From the entire range of infections that we have collected samples from, endophthalmitis cases can probably be the ones which could have been infection acquired during medical care and not from the community. Even in our series of endophthalmitis cases, there were no cluster infections, which could be the evidence to hospital-acquired infections. We thank the reader for sensitizing us toward the point.

Regarding the methods of specimen collection in cases of orbital cellulitis, in the presence of open wound or drainage site, materials were obtained by aspiration with a sterile syringe and needle for immediate inoculation onto appropriate culture media. [4],[6],[7]

The article, which was published in Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology, [8] contains data of samples submitted to microbiology laboratory for microbiological evaluations between January 2005 and December 2005. During this study period of 1 year, we had not received ocular samples for microbiological evaluation from cases of orbital cellulitis; however, we had samples from three cases of pre-septal cellulitis.

 
  References Top

1.
Chandravanshi SL. It is really a study of community-acquired bacterial infections? Indian J Ophthalmol 2012;60:157-8.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
2.
Bharathi MJ, Ramakrishnan R, Shivakumar C, Meenakshi R, Lionalraj D. Etiology and antibacterial susceptibility pattern of community-acquired bacterial ocular infections in a tertiary eye care hospital in south India. Indian J Ophthalmol 2010;58:497-507.   Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
3.
Byrne KA, Burd E, Tabbara K, Hyndiuk R, editors. Diagnostic Microbiology and Cytology of the Eye. Boston: Butterworth Heinemann; 1995.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Wilhelmus KR, Liesegang TJ, Osato MS, Jones DB, Specter SC, editors. Cumulative Techniques and Procedures in Clinical Microbiology: Laboratory diagnosis of ocular infections. Washington DC: American Society for Microbiology; 1994.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing; seventeenth informational supplement. 19th ed, Vol. 1. Performance Standards for Antimicrobial Disk Susceptibility Tests: CLSI documentM100-S17. M2-A9. Approved Standard; 2007. p. 27.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Liu IT, Kao SC, Wang AG, Tsai CC, Liang CK, Hsu WM. Preseptal and orbital cellulites: A 10-year review of hospitalized patients. J Chin Med Assoc 2006;69:415-22.  Back to cited text no. 6
[PUBMED]  [FULLTEXT]  
7.
Chaudhry IA, Shamsi FA, Elzaridi E, Al-Rashed, Al-Amri A, Al-Anezi F, et al. Outcome of treated orbital cellulites in a tertiary eye care center in the Middle East. Ophthalmology 2007;114:345-54.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Ramesh S, Ramakrishnan R, Bharathi MJ, Amuthan M, Viswanathan S. Prevalence of bacterial pathogens causing ocular infections in South India. Indian J Pathol Microbiol 2010;53:281-6.  Back to cited text no. 8
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  




 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2557    
    Printed13    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded75    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal