Glyxambi
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 4369
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page

   Table of Contents      
EDITORIAL
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 61  |  Issue : 11  |  Page : 619-620

Minimally invasive vitreo retinal surgery: How small do we go?


Editor, Indian Journal of Ophthalmology, Chairman, Managing Director, Aditya Jyot Eye Hospital Pvt Ltd, Wadala (W), Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Date of Web Publication16-Dec-2013

Correspondence Address:
Sundaram Natarajan
Editor, Indian Journal of Ophthalmology, Chairman, Managing Director, Aditya Jyot Eye Hospital Pvt Ltd, Wadala (W), Mumbai, Maharashtra
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0301-4738.123108

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Natarajan S. Minimally invasive vitreo retinal surgery: How small do we go?. Indian J Ophthalmol 2013;61:619-20

How to cite this URL:
Natarajan S. Minimally invasive vitreo retinal surgery: How small do we go?. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 2013 [cited 2019 Dec 7];61:619-20. Available from: http://www.ijo.in/text.asp?2013/61/11/619/123108

The armamentarium of vitreo retinal surgeons has advanced tremendously with advances in physics and now the focus is on the maximum benefit that can be derived using micro incisions.

The 23-G and 25-G systems have become fairly common and several studies have been done to determine the safety, advantages and disadvantages of small gauge sutureless surgery. [1] Though higher infusion and aspiration pressures are needed to remove the vitreous using small gauge probes, the corresponding damage on tissues is also substantially lower.

My own experience with the small gauge vitrectomy system encouraged me to embrace this advancement in totality. My experience shows that the smaller gauge vitrectomy techniques shorten operating time and improve patient comfort. By minimizing surgically induced trauma, it decreases the post-operative inflammatory response and hastens recovery. Although higher pressures are needed for injection of silicon oil especially the heavy oil, the overall outcomes are much better. Various surgical procedures have been performed with microincision vitrectomy surgery (MIVS) but it is being advocated for macular holes and epiretinal membrane (ERM) surgery. Sandali et al. in their study [2] concluded that in ERM surgery 23-G and 25-G systems are as safe and effective as the 20-G system. They also noted that MIVS systems cause significant reduction in surgical time. Similar results have been reported by Haas et al. [3] I prefer a proportional mode vitrectomy for the separation of the membrane from the retina and it has given me excellent results.

Concerns have been raised about the increased risk of endophthalmitis with 23-G and 25-G instrumentation. Oshima et al. in their study Multicenter survey with a systematic overview of acute-onset endophthalmitis after transconjunctival MIVS [4] found no significant difference in the incidence of post vitrectomy endophthalmitis between MIVS and 20-G vitrectomy similar results were observed by Bahrani et al. [5] Our experience is also similar as there have been no differences between the 20-G and MIVS in incidence of post-operative endophthalmitis. Nevertheless, the microsurgical task force came up with guidelines for minimizing endophthalmitis with vitrectomy surgery. [6]

The advent of the 27-G instrument system, has given a totally new dimension to microsurgery. [7] For obvious reasons the fluid dynamics of the 27-G system are lower than 25-G MIVS. The pros and cons of the small gauge system will have to be weighed to decide how small we can go. The desired goal of surgery is to achieve optimal surgical results with minimal damage. Optimal utilization of the newer properties of machines in relation to the characteristics of the disease will have to be assessed to decide the risk benefit ratio of the MIVS system. [8] The risk of instrument bending, leading to lower stability and reduced cutting efficiency is a point for concern. This needs to be compared with improved wound healing and finer surgical results in select cases. I look at the future where further advances in technology will obviate the risks associated with the smaller gauge.

 
  References Top

1.
Thompson JT. Advantages and limitations of small gauge vitrectomy. Surv Ophthalmol 2011;56:162-72.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]    
2.
Sandali O, El Sanharawi M, Lecuen N, Barale PO, Bonnel S, Basli E, et al. 25-, 23-, and 20-gauge vitrectomy in epiretinal membrane surgery: A comparative study of 553 cases. Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol 2011;249:1811-9.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]    
3.
Haas A, Seidel G, Steinbrugger I, Maier R, Gasser-Steiner V, Wedrich A, et al. Twenty-three-gauge and 20-gauge vitrectomy in epiretinal membrane surgery. Retina 2010;30:112-6.  Back to cited text no. 3
[PUBMED]    
4.
Oshima Y, Kadonosono K, Yamaji H, Inoue M, Yoshida M, Kimura H, et al. Multicenter survey with a systematic overview of acute-onset endophthalmitis after transconjunctival microincision vitrectomy surgery. Am J Ophthalmol 2010;150:716-51.e1.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Bahrani HM, Fazelat AA, Thomas M, Hirose T, Kroll AJ, Lou PL, et al. Endophthalmitis in the era of small gauge transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy - Meta analysis and review of literature. Semin Ophthalmol 2010;25:275-82.  Back to cited text no. 5
[PUBMED]    
6.
Shah RE, Gupta O. The microsurgical safety task force: Guidelines for minimizing endophthalmitis with vitrectomy surgery. Curr Opin Ophthalmol 2012;23:189-94.  Back to cited text no. 6
[PUBMED]    
7.
Oshima Y, Wakabayashi T, Sato T, Ohji M, Tano Y. A 27-gauge instrument system for transconjunctival sutureless microincision vitrectomy surgery. Ophthalmology 2010;117:93-1022.  Back to cited text no. 7
[PUBMED]    
8.
Magalhães O Jr, Maia M, Rodrigues EB, Machado L, Costa EF, Maia A, et al. Perspective on fluid and solid dynamics in different pars plana vitrectomy systems. Am J Ophthalmol 2011;151:401-51.  Back to cited text no. 8
    




 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed888    
    Printed7    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded165    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal