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BRIEF COMMUNICATION
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 61  |  Issue : 11  |  Page : 681-682

IIH with normal CSF pressures?


Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul Artificial Eye Center, Seoul National University Hospital Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea

Correspondence Address:
Seong-Joon Kim
Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28, Yeongeon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744
Korea
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0301-4738.119416

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Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) in the absence of space occupying lesions. ICP is usually measured by lumbar puncture and a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure above 250 mm H 2 O is one of the diagnostic criteria of IIH. Recently, we have encountered two patients who complained of headaches and exhibited disc swelling without an increased ICP. We prescribed acetazolamide and followed both patients frequently; because of the definite disc swelling with IIH related symptoms. Symptoms and signs resolved in both patients after they started taking acetazolamide. It is generally known that an elevated ICP, as measured by lumbar puncture, is the most important diagnostic sign of IIH. However, these cases caution even when CSF pressure is within the normal range, that suspicion should be raised when a patient has papilledema with related symptoms, since untreated papilledema may cause progressive and irreversible visual loss.


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