Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 1945
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 62  |  Issue : 8  |  Page : 861-864

Comparison of intracameral dexamethasone and intracameral triamcinolone acetonide injection at the end of phacoemulsification surgery


1 Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Başkent University, Ankara, Turkey
2 Department of Health Care Management, Faculty of Medicine, Başkent University, Ankara, Turkey

Correspondence Address:
Sirel Gur Gungor
Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Fevzi Çakmak Caddesi, 06490, Bahçelievler, Ankara
Turkey
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0301-4738.141045

Clinical trial registration KA13/178

Rights and Permissions

Purpose: To compare the results of intracameral dexamethasone and intracameral triamcinolone acetonide injection in patients that underwent cataract surgery with phacoemulsification. Materials and Methods: Sixty eyes of 60 patients that underwent cataract surgery with phacoemulsification were randomized into two groups. Preoperative visual acuity of all patients was 0.5 or lower and intraocular pressures were under 21mmHg. After surgery, eyes in group 1 (30 eyes) were injected with 0.4 mg/0.1 ml dexamethasone into the anterior chamber, and eyes in group 2 (30 eyes) were injected with 2 mg/0.05 ml triamcinolone acetonide into the anterior chamber. All eyes received standard postoperative prednisolone acetate and moxifloxacin eye drops. The biomicroscopic evaluation, visual acuity, and intraocular pressure measurements were done at baseline (preoperatively) and on postoperative days 1, 7 and 30. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in mean visual acuity, the amount of anterior cells and flare between the two groups (P ≥ 0.05). Mean intraocular pressure values at postoperative first day were significantly higher in group 2 than in group 1 (P = 0.009). The mean intraocular pressures on days 7 and 30 after surgery were not statistically different between the two groups (P ≥ 0.05). Conclusions: Intracameral dexamethasone and intracameral triamcinolone acetonide were similarly effective in controlling postoperative inflammation following phacoemulsification. However, the intraocular pressures on postoperative first day were higher in patients receiving intracameral triamcinolone acetonide. The highest intraocular pressure in triamcinolone acetonide group was 24 mmHg, and stabilized in a few days, therefore using triamcinolone acetonide may impose a minimal risk to patients. Nevertheless, intracameral dexamethasone seems to be a better alternative to apply at the end of surgery to suppress the inflammation during the first 24 hours.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2164    
    Printed30    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded433    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal