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BRIEF COMMUNICATION
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 63  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 59-61

Ocular pressure waveform reflects ventricular bigeminy and aortic insufficiency


1 Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA
2 Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio; Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA
3 Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio; Department of Anesthesiology and The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA
4 Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio; Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA

Correspondence Address:
Cynthia J Roberts
915 Olentangy River Road, Columbus, Ohio 43212
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0301-4738.151472

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Ocular pulse amplitude (OPA) is defined as the difference between maximum and minimum intraocular pressure (IOP) during a cardiac cycle. Average values of OPA range from 1 to 4 mmHg. The purpose of this investigation is to determine the source of an irregular IOP waveform with elevated OPA in a 48-year-old male. Ocular pressure waveforms had an unusual shape consistent with early ventricular contraction. With a normal IOP, OPA was 9 mmHg, which is extraordinarily high. The subject was examined by a cardiologist and was determined to be in ventricular bigeminy. In addition, he had bounding carotid pulses and echocardiogram confirmed aortic insufficiency. After replacement of the aortic valve, the bigeminy resolved and the ocular pulse waveform became regular in appearance with an OPA of 1.6-2.0 mmHg. The ocular pressure waveform is a direct reflection of hemodynamics. Evaluating this waveform may provide an additional opportunity for screening subjects for cardiovascular anomalies and arrhythmias.


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