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AUTHORíS REPLY
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 63  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 171

Authors' reply


Department of Vitreoretinal and Ocular Oncology Services, Sankara Eye Hospital, Kundanahalli Gate, Bangaluru, Karnataka, India

Date of Web Publication1-Apr-2015

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Mahesh P Shanmugam
Department of Vitreoretinal and Ocular Oncology Services, Sankara Eye Hospital, Kundanahalli Gate, Bangaluru - 560 037, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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How to cite this article:
Shanmugam MP, Mishra DK, Madhukumar R, Ramanjulu R, Reddy SY, Rodrigues G. Authors' reply. Indian J Ophthalmol 2015;63:171

How to cite this URL:
Shanmugam MP, Mishra DK, Madhukumar R, Ramanjulu R, Reddy SY, Rodrigues G. Authors' reply. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 2015 [cited 2019 Nov 21];63:171. Available from: http://www.ijo.in/text.asp?2015/63/2/171/154408

Dear Sir,

We thank the authors of the letter for their interest in our article and for sharing their experience. We agree with them on android phones being the less expensive and ubiquitous option, and we did use various models of android phones extensively in our study. [1]

We did try using the assistive light widget as an aid to obtain still photos; however, the assistive light turns off once the camera app is activated in most phones, precluding its use to obtain still photos.

We agree that using the 28 D lens, if available is a good option. We also found that using 40 D lens in conjunction with the smartphone allows imaging through a small pupil and media opacities such as cataract and corneal scars. While one can use the zoom function to obtain magnified images, it also comes with the disadvantage of compromised resolution of the image with digital zoom. Minimal hand movements are exaggerated when trying to capture a zoomed image, often resulting in loss of focus. Hence, it is preferable for a beginner to start with a nonmagnified image and progress to capturing zoomed images.

As rightly pointed out by the authors, reducing the exposure reduces the reflections and improves the contrast, and we have indicated the same in our paper as well. We agree that using various apps and postcapture editing will enhance the quality of the images.

We have successfully screened 200 eyes of diabetic patient using our technique of smartphone indirect ophthalmoscopy with good sensitivity and specificity of (80-87%), this being an indication of the potential of smartphone screening in camp settings (unpublished data).

 
  References Top

1.
Shanmugam MP, Mishra DK, Madhukumar R, Ramanjulu R, Reddy SY, Rodrigues G. Fundus imaging with a mobile phone: A review of techniques. Indian J Ophthalmol 2014;62:960-2.  Back to cited text no. 1
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