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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 63  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 306-311

Ophthalmic surgical training in Karnataka and Southern India: Present status and future interests from a survey of final-year residents


1 Department of Ophthalmology, M. S. Ramaiah Medical College, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Glaucoma, M M Joshi Eye Institute, Hubli, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. K Ajay
No. 233, 18th Main Road, 6th Block, Koramangala, Bengaluru - 560 095, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0301-4738.158067

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Settings and Design: This study documents a survey of final-year ophthalmology postgraduates on the subject of their surgical training and their future plans after residency. Purpose: This survey aimed to answer the question, "What is the present status of surgical training in ophthalmic training centers?" by obtaining information from students about (1) various methods used in surgical training (2) numbers and types of surgeries performed by them in the training centers (3) their plans after residency. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire containing 21 questions was distributed to 155 students attending an intensive 4-day teaching program. The questions related to orientation training, wet lab training, facilities for training, free surgical camps and detailed information about numbers and types of surgeries observed and performed. Completed questionnaires were collected, and responses analyzed. Results: One hundred and seven completed responses were analyzed. The majority had not received formal orientation training. More than half had undergone wet lab training. Most residents performed their first ophthalmic surgery during the 1 st year of residency and went to the operation theatre multiple times a week. Most of the students planned to undergo further training after residency. More than half of the students found their surgical training to be fair or satisfactory. Conclusions: The number and frequency of ophthalmic surgeries done by residents appear satisfactory, but further efforts from trainers on enhancing the quality and range of surgical training would benefit students and improve their satisfaction.


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