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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 64  |  Issue : 10  |  Page : 756-761

Association between the p53 codon 72 polymorphism and primary open-angle glaucoma risk: Meta-analysis based on 11 case–control studies


1 Department of Ophthalmology, Geriatric Ophthalmology Research Center, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran
2 Departments of Medical Genetics, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran
3 Department of Emergency Medicine, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran
4 Department of Emergency Medicine, Infectious Diseases Research Center, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Hossein Neámatzadeh
Department of Medical Genetics, Shahid Sadoughi Hospital, Bou Ali Avenue, Safaieh, P.O. Box 734, Yazd
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0301-4738.195002

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The TP53 is important in functions of cell cycle control, apoptosis, and maintenance of DNA integrity. Studies on the association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) risk have yielded conflicting results. Published literature from PubMed and Web of Science databases was retrieved. All studies evaluating the association between p53 codon 72 polymorphisms and POAG were included. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Eleven separate studies including 2541 cases and 1844 controls were pooled in the meta-analysis. We did not detect a significant association between POAG risk and p53 codon 72 polymorphism overall population except allele genetic model (C vs. G: OR = 0.961, 95% CI = 0.961–0.820, P = 0.622). In the stratified analysis for Asians and Caucasians, there was an association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and POAG. In the dominant model in the overall population and by ethnicity subgroups, the highest elevated POAG risk was presented. In summary, these results indicate that p53 codon 72 polymorphism is likely an important genetic factor contributing to susceptibility of POAG. However, more case–controls studies based on larger sample size and stratified by ethnicity are suggested to further clarify the relationship between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and POAG.


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