Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 5955
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page

   Table of Contents      
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 64  |  Issue : 7  |  Page : 546-547

Comment on: An unusual presentation of nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy with subretinal fluid treated with intravitreal bevacizumab


Shri Ganesh Vinayak Eye Hospital, Opposite Colours Mall, Dhamtari Road, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India

Date of Web Publication9-Sep-2016

Correspondence Address:
Charudutt Kalamkar
Shri Ganesh Vinayak Eye Hospital, Opposite Colours Mall, Dhamtari Road, Raipur - 492 001, Chhattisgarh
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0301-4738.190173

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Kalamkar C, Radke NV, Mukherjee A, Radke SN. Comment on: An unusual presentation of nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy with subretinal fluid treated with intravitreal bevacizumab. Indian J Ophthalmol 2016;64:546-7

How to cite this URL:
Kalamkar C, Radke NV, Mukherjee A, Radke SN. Comment on: An unusual presentation of nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy with subretinal fluid treated with intravitreal bevacizumab. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 2016 [cited 2020 Feb 28];64:546-7. Available from: http://www.ijo.in/text.asp?2016/64/7/546/190173

Sir,

It was with great interest we read the article "An unusual presentation of nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) with subretinal fluid treated with intravitreal bevacizumab" by Dave and Pappuru. [1] We have noticed some points in the text and would like to put forth few queries which we feel were not addressed adequately in this article.

Diabetic status of the patient has not been mentioned. It is known that diabetes mellitus, apart from hypertension, is a predisposing factor for the development of NAION and the characteristics of such patients differ from nondiabetic patients with NAION. [2]

We agree that macular edema is an unusual finding in NAION even in fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) studies as mentioned by the authors. Yet the authors have not mentioned FFA findings in the article. We believe FFA of the affected eye is essential in cases of atypical NAION with sub retinal fluid (SRF) to rule out inflammatory pathologies. Other eye's visual fields, fundus image, FFA, and optical coherence tomography would have been helpful for comparison and to rule out any other pathologies.

Improvement in visual acuity cannot be contributed to intravitreal bevacizumab with certainty as vision is known to improve, in >40% cases, with the natural history of disease. [3] Authors have documented 20/200 best-corrected visual acuity in other eye post-NAION. Hayreh and Zimmerman have shown the difference in final visual outcomes in eyes of patients with bilateral sequential NAION. [4] Low final vision in one eye cannot be used as a predictor of poor prognosis when other eye develops NAION and should not be an indication for interventional treatment.

Authors have documented an improvement in visual acuity but have not commented on the visual fields during follow-up.

We found two reports of intravitreal bevacizumab being associated with the development of NAION in literature and we are mentioning one due to the restriction of a number of references. [5] It is postulated to be due to the transient raised IOP caused by the injection affecting the already compromised optic disc. Keeping this in mind and the fact that NAION recovers to some extent in its natural history, we feel that this therapy needs to be proved through proper randomized trials before being tried in NAION patients.

Macular edema and subretinal fluid have also been described in literature and have been shown to resolve without use of any treatment. [2] We feel the presence of subretinal fluid or macular edema does not necessitate treatment in such cases.

The authors, Dave et al. have mentioned in their reference number 11 that the article on "Macular star in Optic neuropathy" by Wang AG, Lui JH, Lin CL, and Yen MYwas published in "Am J Ophthalmol," when in fact it was published in "Annals of ophthalmology" in 1995.

The abstract mentions the last follow-up being at 6 months while text documents it as 3 months.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
  References Top

1.
Dave VP, Pappuru RR. An unusual presentation of nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy with subretinal fluid treated with intravitreal bevacizumab. Indian J Ophthalmol 2016;64:87-8.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
2.
Hayreh SS, Zimmerman MB. Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy: Clinical characteristics in diabetic patients versus nondiabetic patients. Ophthalmology 2008;115:1818-25.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]    
3.
Hayreh SS, Zimmerman MB. Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy: Natural history of visual outcome. Ophthalmology 2008;115:298-305.e2.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Hayreh SS, Zimmerman MB. Bilateral nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy: Comparison of visual outcome in the two eyes. J Neuroophthalmol 2013;33:338-43.  Back to cited text no. 4
[PUBMED]    
5.
Hosseini H, Razeghinejad MR. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy after intravitreal injection of bevacizumab. J Neuroophthalmol 2009;29:160-1.  Back to cited text no. 5
[PUBMED]    




 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed603    
    Printed8    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded105    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal