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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 65  |  Issue : 11  |  Page : 1178-1181

Efficacy of 1% atropine eye drops in retarding progressive axial myopia in Indian eyes


1 Department of Pediatric Refractive Services, Jyotirmay Eye Clinic for Children and Adult Squint and Ocular Motility Laboratory, Thane; Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology, Mahatme Eye Hospital, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Pediatric Refractive Services, Jyotirmay Eye Clinic for Children and Adult Squint and Ocular Motility Laboratory, Thane, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Mihir Kothari
Jyotirmay Eye Clinic for Children and Adult Squint, Ocular Motility Lab and Pediatric Low Vision Center, 104, 105 Kaalika Tower, Kolbad Road, Khopat, Thane West 400 601, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_418_17

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Purpose: The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of 1% atropine eye drops for the retardation of progressive axial myopia in Indian eyes. Methods: This prospective interventional cohort study included children aged 5–16 years. Both the eyes of myopic children with progressive increase of ≥−0.5D sphere/year with the best-corrected vision of ≥6/6 were treated with once a day application of 1% atropine eye drops and progressive addition photogray lenses. The progression of myopia after 1-year follow-up was analyzed. Results: Sixty eyes of thirty myopes were included in the study. The mean age was 10 years and 15 were girls. The mean baseline sphere was −5.2D (−2.5D–−13D). Mean duration of follow-up was 23 months (12–36 months). The baseline rate of progression was reduced from −0.6D/year (range −0.5D/year to −3D/year) to −0.2D/year (range 0D/year to −1.5D/year) after atropine therapy. Seventeen patients (57%) had to use the atropine in the daytime to reach the target progression of <−0.5D/year. There was no difference between the efficacy of atropine drops in the boys and girls (P = 0.6). The efficacy of atropine drops did not have a correlation with the age of the patients or the magnitude of baseline myopia (Pearson's r = 0). Conclusion: 1% atropine eye drops was well tolerated and efficacious for the retardation of progressive myopia in Indian eyes. Effectiveness was better with daytime application. Further studies are necessary to assess the role of 1% atropine in the rapid progressors and patients poorly responding to low-dose atropine.


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