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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 66  |  Issue : 11  |  Page : 1532-1538

Imagining eye care in India (2018 Lalit Prakash Agarwal lecture)


1 Srimati Kanuri Santhamma Centre for Vitreoretinal Diseases, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana; Indian Oil Center for Rural Eye Health, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
2 Indian Oil Center for Rural Eye Health, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Taraprasad Das
Srimati Kanuri Santhamma Centre for Vitreoretinal Diseases, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad - 500 034, Telangana
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_872_18

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India has done well in eye care delivery by recognizing visual impairment and blindness as a major medical challenge. Major contributions have come from ophthalmologists (mass cataract surgery in the early 1900s; major participation of non-government organizations), policy makers (National Program for Control of Blindness and Visual Impairment 1976; systematic development under the World Bank assisted India Cataract Project, 1995–2002), and the industry (manufacturing of affordable surgical instruments and medicines). Although the country could boast of higher cataract surgical coverage and near-total elimination of trachoma, there is increasing prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and undetected glaucoma. India is in the crossroad of adherence to old successful models of service delivery and adoption of new innovative methods of teaching and training, manpower development and skill-based training, relevant medical research and product development. In the absence of these new approaches, the initial gains in eye care could not be furthered in India. A new approach, that will combine the best of the “old” tradition of empathy and the “new” technology of analytics, is required to imagine the future of eye care in India.


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