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   Table of Contents      
OPHTHALMIC IMAGES
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 66  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 572

Rapid regression of retinal neovascularization following intravitreal bevacizumab in branch retinal vein occlusion imaged by optical coherence tomography angiography


1 Department of Retina, Grewal Eye Institute, Chandigarh, India
2 Duke Eye Center, Durham, NC, USA

Date of Web Publication26-Mar-2018

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Manpreet Brar
Grewal Eye Institute, SCO 168-169, Madhya Marg, Chandigarh - 160 069
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_868_17

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How to cite this article:
Brar M, Grewal DS, Sharma M, Grewal S P. Rapid regression of retinal neovascularization following intravitreal bevacizumab in branch retinal vein occlusion imaged by optical coherence tomography angiography. Indian J Ophthalmol 2018;66:572

How to cite this URL:
Brar M, Grewal DS, Sharma M, Grewal S P. Rapid regression of retinal neovascularization following intravitreal bevacizumab in branch retinal vein occlusion imaged by optical coherence tomography angiography. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 2018 [cited 2019 Aug 24];66:572. Available from: http://www.ijo.in/text.asp?2018/66/4/572/228485



Retinal neovascularization developing secondary to ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) is conventionally treated with sector panretinal photocoagulation (PRP). Elevated levels of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) play an important role in the development of these new vessels [1] and thus administration of anti-VEGF agents has been reported to be of therapeutic use as well.[2],[3] We present a case of BRVO in a 55-year-old female, previously treated with PRP that had persistent neovascularization that was treated with a single anti-VEGF injection. The authors report the use of optical coherence tomography-angiography (OCT-A) as a noninvasive imaging platform to demonstrate its value in diagnosing retinal neovascularization and treatment response following anti-VEGF injection [Figure 1].
Figure 1: Optical coherence tomography angiography scans. Retina slab (6 × 6 mm) fovea centered (a) and 8 mm × 8 mm (b) inferior to the macula demonstrated profound capillary nonperfusion in the inferotemporal quadrant (star). Morphology of the retinal neovascularization; that is large frond of abnormal vasculature (bold arrow) and terminal loops of irregular proliferation of small-caliber new vessels (small arrows) called as exuberant vascular proliferation (EVP) are seen. 4 weeks postbevacizumab injection showed pruning of new vessel (bold arrow) with dramatic reduction in the EVP (small arrow) (c and d)

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  Conclusion Top


Intravitreal injection of anti-VEGF achieved short-term reduction of leakage from persistent active neovascularization (NVE) with ischemic BRVO as demonstrated using noninvasive OCT-A.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Tripathi RC, Li J, Tripathi BJ, Chalam KV, Adamis AP. Increased level of vascular endothelial growth factor in aqueous humor of patients with neovascular glaucoma. Ophthalmology 1998;105:232-7.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]    
2.
Avery RL, Pearlman J, Pieramici DJ, Rabena MD, Castellarin AA, Nasir MA, et al. Intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin) in the treatment of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Ophthalmology 2006;113:1695e1-15.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Spaide RF, Fisher YL. Intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin) treatment of proliferative diabetic retinopathy complicated by vitreous hemorrhage. Retina 2006;26:275-8.  Back to cited text no. 3
[PUBMED]    


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