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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 67  |  Issue : 10  |  Page : 1544-1547

Cerebral visual impairment is a major cause of profound visual impairment in children aged less than 3 years: A study from tertiary eye care center in South India


1 Head, The David Brown Children's Eye Care Centre, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Kode Venkatadri Chowdary Campus, Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh, India
2 Low Vision Optometrist, Institute for Vision Rehabilitation, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Kode Venkatadri Chowdary Campus, Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh, India
3 Emeritus Professor of Visual Science, Department of Vision Science, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Niranjan K Pehere
The David Brown Children's Eye Care Centre, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Kode Venkatadri Chowdary Campus, Tadigadapa, Vijayawada - 521 137, Andhra Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_1850_18

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Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate causes for profound visual impairment in children ≤3 years of age at a tertiary eye care center in Andhra Pradesh, India. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted for all the children (≤3 years) who attended the pediatric ophthalmology service between January 2012 and February 2017. Results: A total of 428 severely visually impaired children aged ≤3 years were seen during the study period: 264 (62%) of them were boys and I64 (38%) were girls. The average age at presentation was 14.02 months. The causes of visual impairment were cerebral visual impairment (CVI) 142 (33%), a combination of CVI and ocular visual impairment (OVI) 48 (11%), and OVI only 236 (56%), which included congenital cataract 56 (13.1%), retinopathy of prematurity 52 (I2.6%), optic atrophy 17 (4.5%), congenital nystagmus (4.4%), congenital globe anomalies 2I (5.2%), and high refractive errors - 10 (2.8%). Delays in different areas of development were seen in 103 out of 142 children with CVI (72.5%), which included motor delay 53 (51.5%), cognitive delay 15 (14.6%), speech delay in 3 (2.9%), and delay in multiple areas of development (like combination of motor, cognitive, and speech delay) in 32 (31.1%). Conclusion: In children under 3 years of age, CVI is a major cause of profound visual impairment in our area and the majority of them manifest delay in several areas of development.


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