Glyxambi
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 2588
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page


 
   Table of Contents      
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 67  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 173-174

Comment on: Comparative analysis of non-absorbable 10-0 nylon sutures with absorbable 10-0 vicryl sutures in pediatric cataract surgery


Children Eye Care Center, Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Sadguru Netra Chikitsalaya and Postgraduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Satna, Madhya Pradesh, India

Date of Web Publication21-Dec-2018

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Amit Mohan
Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Sadguru Netra Chikitsalaya and Postgraduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Jankikund, Chitrakoot, Satna - 210 204, Madhya Pradesh
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_877_18

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Mohan A, Sen P, Jain E. Comment on: Comparative analysis of non-absorbable 10-0 nylon sutures with absorbable 10-0 vicryl sutures in pediatric cataract surgery. Indian J Ophthalmol 2019;67:173-4

How to cite this URL:
Mohan A, Sen P, Jain E. Comment on: Comparative analysis of non-absorbable 10-0 nylon sutures with absorbable 10-0 vicryl sutures in pediatric cataract surgery. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Aug 22];67:173-4. Available from: http://www.ijo.in/text.asp?2019/67/1/173/248174



Sir,

We read the article “Comparative analysis of non-absorbable 10-0 nylon sutures with absorbable 10-0 Vicryl sutures in pediatric cataract surgery” with interest.[1] Sutures are routinely used in pediatric patients below 2 years of age irrespective of wound architecture and leak at the completion of surgery. There are increased risks of suture-related complications, and early removal of nonabsorbable sutures is advocated.[2] In the current study, 34.4% of eyes in nylon group and 19.7% eyes of vicryl group required earlier and unscheduled suture removal. Bringing the children back for suture removal is inconvenient both for the patient and surgeon because of repeat anesthesia risk, time consumption, cost, and increased risk of infection.[3]

We routinely use 10-0 vicryl suture in pediatric cataract surgery since 2016 at our institute, which we do not remove at all. Prior to that, we were using 10-0 nylon suture which were removed routinely at 3 months postoperatively or earlier when required. Endophthalmitis following suture removal are also mentioned in the literature.[4]

On retrospective analysis of our medical records from April 2016 to December 2017, 213 pediatric cataract surgeries (154 with IOL and 59 without IOL) were performed at our institute in children below 2 years of age. In all cases, we applied vicryl [Figure 1] and [Figure 2] and none required either resuturing or suture removal. In 5 eyes, there were debris deposits and 2 had suspected infiltrations at the suture site which were managed conservatively with saline irrigation and topical 5% Povidone solution followed by frequent antibiotic instillation for a week. Absorption of Vicryl suture starts in 2–3 weeks and gets completely absorbed in 60–90 days, and it loses tensile strength up to 75% at 14 days; thus, it appears unnecessary to remove the suture because of its loose and vascularized nature.[5] It is also soft and does not cause any irritations to the child even when knots are exposed or sutures are broken.
Figure 1: Vicryl suture in aphakic child

Click here to view
Figure 2: Vicryl suture in pseudophakic child

Click here to view


Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Matalia J, Panmand P, Ghalla P. Comparative analysis of non-absorbable 10-0 nylon sutures with absorbable 10-0 vicryl sutures in pediatric cataract surgery. Indian J Ophthalmol 2018;66:661-4.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  
2.
Heaven CJ, Davison CR, Cockcroft PM. Bacterial contamination of nylon corneal sutures. Eye (Lond) 1995;9 (Pt 1):116-8.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Bar-Sela SM, Spierer O, Spierer A. Suture-related complications after congenital cataract surgery: Vicryl versus mersilene sutures. J Cataract Refract Surg 2007;33:301-4.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Culbert RB, Devenyi RG. Bacterial endophthalmitis after suture removal. J Cataract Refract Surg 1999;25:725-7.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Roper-Hall MJ. Stallard's Eye Surgery. 7th ed. Bristol J Wright, 1989. p. 10-4.  Back to cited text no. 5
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]



 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
References
Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed506    
    Printed1    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded76    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal