Glyxambi
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 2320
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page


 
   Table of Contents      
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 67  |  Issue : 7  |  Page : 1253-1254

The additional role of unmodified iPhone X as a direct ophthalmoscope


Dr. Rajendra Prasad Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Date of Web Publication25-Jun-2019

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Amar Pujari
Dr. Rajendra Prasad Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Room No 212, Second Floor, RPC-1, New Delhi - 110 029
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_90_19

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Pujari A, Markan A, Chawla R, Gagrani M. The additional role of unmodified iPhone X as a direct ophthalmoscope. Indian J Ophthalmol 2019;67:1253-4

How to cite this URL:
Pujari A, Markan A, Chawla R, Gagrani M. The additional role of unmodified iPhone X as a direct ophthalmoscope. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Jul 20];67:1253-4. Available from: http://www.ijo.in/text.asp?2019/67/7/1253/261060



Dear Sir,

Smartphone-based image acquisition is increasingly becoming popular in the field of ophthalmology. Higher resolution camera applications have made it possible to acquire high-definition images of the anterior segment, posterior segment, and the periocular lesions with great ease and at a lesser cost. We have described a few techniques of the anterior segment and optic disc image acquisition using a smartphone-macro lens combination (a small, magnifying lens attachment called the macro lens, no financial interest).[1],[2] The cost of this lens is less than 2USD, and using this lens we were able to acquire high-resolution images. These are very simple techniques that help in a better appreciation of the finer details of the cornea, iris, retina, and the optic nerve head (for retina and the disc 90D lens is additionally used). In addition, we also highlighted the utility of this technique for the quantification of the iris torsion.[3]

Using an unmodified iPhone X, Gunasekera et al. have described on how to capture the images of optic disc.[4] We also performed an observation using unmodified iPhone X and found that the image qualities obtained by this technique are also of good quality. In addition, the details of the peripapillary area and the macula can also be better appreciated; however, this has been lacking in the previous observation by Gunasekera et al. [Figure 1]a and [Figure 1]b. Therefore, this expands the existing knowledge regarding the utility of unmodified iPhone X just to image the optic disc.
Figure 1: (a) Optic disc (black arrow) and the peripapillary area (white arrow) can be better appreciated in their entirety. (b) Macula details including dull foveal details (black arrow) can be very well appreciated with unmodified iPhone X. Smartphone recorded videos possess better details as compared to the screenshots (standstill images) obtained from them

Click here to view


As significant ocular pathologies along disc, macula, and the peripapillary area can be documented with greater ease in one frame, the unmodified iPhone X can be helpful in imaging the major posterior pole retinal diseases. Therefore, the resident ophthalmologists and other practitioners can adopt these techniques and further refine them to maximize the utility of smartphone-based imaging technology in ophthalmology. This, in turn, helps in saving precious time in busy clinics to serve the patients better.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Pujari A, Mukhija R, Singh AB, Chawla R, Sharma N, Kumar A. Smartphone-based high definition anterior segment photography. Indian J Ophthalmol 2018;66:1375-6.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  
2.
Pujari A, Mukhija R, Chawla R, Phuljhele S, Saxena R, Sharma P. Smartphone-based evaluation of the optic nerve head. Indian J Ophthalmol 2018;66:1617-8.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  
3.
Pujari A, Mukhija R, Phuljhele S. Quantification of change in iris torsion using a smartphone. Ophthalmology 2018;126:126.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Gunasekera CD, Thomas P. High-resolution direct ophthalmoscopy with an unmodified iPhone X. JAMA Ophthalmol 2018;29:1-2.  Back to cited text no. 4
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1]



 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
References
Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed207    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded42    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal