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LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 68  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 261

Response to comments on: Changes in pattern electroretinogram after application of 0.01% atropine eye drops


Jyotirmay Eye Clinic, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Date of Web Publication19-Dec-2019

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Mihir Kothari
Jyotirmay Eye Clinic, 104, 105 Kaalika Tower, Kolbad Road, Khopat, Thane West - 400 601, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_2086_19

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How to cite this article:
Kothari M, Bhat D, Khadse N, Jain R, Rathod V. Response to comments on: Changes in pattern electroretinogram after application of 0.01% atropine eye drops. Indian J Ophthalmol 2020;68:261

How to cite this URL:
Kothari M, Bhat D, Khadse N, Jain R, Rathod V. Response to comments on: Changes in pattern electroretinogram after application of 0.01% atropine eye drops. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Apr 4];68:261. Available from: http://www.ijo.in/text.asp?2020/68/1/261/273224



Dear Sir,

We are thankful to Jethani et al.[1] for their interest in our paper.[2] The reason for their “inability” to detect the changes in the pattern electroretinogram (PERG) following the instillations of 0.01% atropine eye drops may be due to a simple explanation.

Skin electrodes, used by Jethani et al., measure more than 100 μv and pick up more neural noise. The machine then processes the signal by complex averaging of the signals changing the actual result. DTL electrodes, used by us, are applied to the eye and capture very small and noise-free electrical signals ranging from just 1.0 μv to 20 μv. We caution the clinicians against the use of skin electrodes in obtaining the PERG, which is against the ISCEV standards.[3] The results obtained using different electrodes on different machines are not comparable.

The PERG changes with 0.01% atropine eye drops reported by us were real. However, it was an experimental condition where 4 drops of 0.01% atropine were applied in succession. It is possible that when only one drop of 0.01% atropine eye drops is applied once at night, no predictable changes might be recorded on PERG.[4]

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Jethani J, Memon S. Comments on: Changes in pattern electroretinogram after application of 0.01% atropine eye drops. Indian J Ophthalmol 2020;68:259-61.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Kothari M, Bhat D, Khadse N, Jain R, Rathod V, Aru P. Changes in pattern electroretinogram after application of 0.01% atropine eye drops. Indian J Ophthalmol 2019;67:309-10.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  
3.
Bach M, Brigell MG, Hawlina M, Holder GE, Johnson MA, McCulloch DL, et al. ISCEV standard AQ6 for clinical pattern electroretinography (PERG): 2012 update. Doc Ophthalmol 2013;126:1-7.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Anders LM, Heinrich SP, Lagrèze WA, Joachimsen L. Little effect of 0.01% atropine eye drops as used in myopia prevention on the pattern electroretinogram. Doc Ophthalmol 2019;138:85-95.  Back to cited text no. 4
    




 

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