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OPHTHALMIC IMAGE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 68  |  Issue : 9  |  Page : 1973

Pseudohypopyon after cataract surgery


Advanced Eye Centre, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Date of Web Publication20-Aug-2020

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Reema Bansal
Advanced Eye Centre, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh - 160012
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_499_20

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How to cite this article:
Kumar N, Bansal R. Pseudohypopyon after cataract surgery. Indian J Ophthalmol 2020;68:1973

How to cite this URL:
Kumar N, Bansal R. Pseudohypopyon after cataract surgery. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Sep 26];68:1973. Available from: http://www.ijo.in/text.asp?2020/68/9/1973/292572



A 50-year-old female presented to us with decreased vision (hand motions) in the left eye after cataract surgery done elsewhere 1 month ago. Diagnosed by the primary surgeon as endophthalmitis, she had received intravitreal antibiotics. The left eye examination revealed intraocular pressure 40 mmHg, aphakia, and mild cellular reaction. The retained lens matter mimicked a hypopyon of almost one-third anterior chamber height [Figure 1]. Posterior segment examination and ultrasonography revealed retained lens matter. She underwent pars plana vitrectomy for removal of lens matter. Retained lens matter in the anterior chamber can present as pseudohypopyon mimicking postoperative endophthalmitis.[1],[2]
Figure 1: Slit-lamp diffuse photograph of the left eye showing aphakia with retained cortical matter presenting as pseudohypopyon

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Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Prakash G, Kumar A, Purohit A. Unusual case of residual cortical lens matter in anterior chamber. Br. J. Ophthalmol 2003;87:1421.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Yeo LM, Charteris DG, Bunce C, Luthert PJ, Gregor ZJ. Retained intravitreal lens fragments after phacoemulsification: a clinicopathological correlation. Br. J Ophthalmol 1999;83:1135-8.  Back to cited text no. 2
    


    Figures

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