Indian Journal of Ophthalmology

OBITUARY
Year
: 1964  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 34--35

Obituary- Dr. Baidya Nath Bhaduri


 

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How to cite this article:
. Obituary- Dr. Baidya Nath Bhaduri.Indian J Ophthalmol 1964;12:34-35


How to cite this URL:
. Obituary- Dr. Baidya Nath Bhaduri. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 1964 [cited 2020 May 30 ];12:34-35
Available from: http://www.ijo.in/text.asp?1964/12/1/34/39073


Full Text

The quiet luster of a distant star does not tell of its magnitude until the astronomist succeeds in analysing certain details. Although Dr. Bhaduri may not have made himself a big noise in Indian Ophthalmology and with his modest and shy temperament had always kept himself in the back­ground those who have studied this star, alone know the magnitude of his contribution to modern ophthalmology. Unfortunately the details of his birth and primary education are not avail­able.

He graduated from the Calcutta Medical College in 1918. He never had a special qualification in ophthal­mology. He never needed it, for his knowledge was second to none in In­dian ophthalmic circles. He was at­tached to the Calcutta Medical College Hospital and then to the R. G. Kar Medical College Hospital where he became Professor of Ophthalmology. After his retirement in 1952, he be­came Emeritus Professor.

In 1954, since the foundation of the M. N. Chatterjee Memorial Eye Hos­pital he became its chairman and visit­ing surgeon. He was also attached to the North Suburban Hospital and Kardah Hospital, near Calcutta. He took keen interest in the cause of Prevention of Blindness and he was one of the Jt. Hony. Secretaries of the Association for the Prevention of Blindness, Bengal from April 1941 to December 1952 and then a committee member of the Association till his death. He was a member of the Joint Committee appointed by the Central Advisory Board of Health and the Central Advisory Board of Education to report on Blindness in India in 1944.

As a teacher he was constantly radiating new knowledge, for he was a prolific reader. This was very evident from his presidentship of the Calcutta Medical Club, and that of the Ophthal­mological Society of Bengal of which he was a founder.

Few know of the role played by him along with Dr. Zachariah in founding the All-India Ophthalmological Society against heavy antagonism from the Indian Medical Service in those days. Dr. Zachariah and he became the first secretaries and thus laid the foundation of that Society. In 1951 he was given the Adenwalla Oration Medal for his work on 'Ocular Changes in Eclampsia-like Condition in Pregnant Rats with Progesterone', and in 1952 was made the President of the Society.

He was an associate editor of the Journal of the All-India Ophthalmo­logical Society and as such he has ren­dered valuable though silent service.

As regards his experience on ophthalmic matters, one can recall the excellent account he gave at the time of the XIXth International Congress when he was given charge of the report on "Ocular Localisation in Tropical Parasitological Diseases". Likewise members of the Indian Ophthalmolo­gical Society will remember and miss his valuable and tempered discussions on practically every paper at the time of our conferences and at the Inter­nationals which he attended.

The fact that his body was taken in a procession to the Calcutta institu­tions with which he was associated, before it was cremated in the presence of a large number of friends and admirers, bears silent testimony to the love with which he had endeared him­self because of his kind and courteous manners, his love for the poor and distressed, his quiet philanthrophy, his gentle and unassuming personality and his profound knowledge and experi­ence.