Indian Journal of Ophthalmology

PHOTO ESSAY
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 65  |  Issue : 11  |  Page : 1215--1216

An unusual intraocular foreign body: Intravitreal cilium following scleral buckling for retinal detachment repair


Sundaram Natarajan, Chinmay Nakhwa, Aylette Jude D Silva 
 Department of Vitreo Retina and Uveitis, Aditya Jyot Eye Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Chinmay Nakhwa
Aditya Jyot, Eye Hospital Pvt. Ltd., 153, Road No 9, Major Parmeswaran Road, Wadala, Mumbai - 400 031, Maharashtra
India




How to cite this article:
Natarajan S, Nakhwa C, D Silva AJ. An unusual intraocular foreign body: Intravitreal cilium following scleral buckling for retinal detachment repair.Indian J Ophthalmol 2017;65:1215-1216


How to cite this URL:
Natarajan S, Nakhwa C, D Silva AJ. An unusual intraocular foreign body: Intravitreal cilium following scleral buckling for retinal detachment repair. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 2017 [cited 2020 Sep 24 ];65:1215-1216
Available from: http://www.ijo.in/text.asp?2017/65/11/1215/218072


Full Text

A 40-year-old high myope had retinal detachment for which he underwent scleral buckling, 18 years ago in 1999. The buckle was removed 6 years later in 2005 because of an infection at the buckle site. He was on a regular follow-up during which a single, intraocular cilium was seen inferiorly at 6 O' clock and has remained stable up to 2017, which is 12 years after buckle removal. It was a complete cilium with the root, basal portion, shaft, and tip with the tip being partially embedded in the retina and the shaft floating into the vitreous cavity [Figure 1]. However, he is doing very well with stable vision (20/100), intraocular pressures (15 mmHg), and the retina being attached.{Figure 1}

 Discussion



Intraocular cilia have been reported following open globe ocular trauma[1] and have been found intraocularly several years post penetrating ocular trauma.[2] They have rarely been seen following cataract surgery.[3],[4] Teo et al. reported a case of intraocular cilia associated with retinal detachment and panophthalmitis.[5] Our case is peculiar because there was no history of penetrating trauma or intraocular surgery. The cilium appears to be from the eyelid of the patient which had possibly entered the eye through a scleral microperforation caused during buckle removal. The exposed buckle and displaced conjunctiva along with the concurrent inflammation can thin the sclera at the site of exposure. This can predispose to scleral microperforation during surgical manipulations while removing the infected buckle. At that time, the cilium might have been partly intraretinal and probably got embedded further due to the intraocular vitreous movement. The cilium has remained inert without causing any inflammation, infection, or granulomas which is evidenced by a clear ocular media, for more than 18 years.

 Conclusion



We report an unusual case of intraocular cilium following scleral bucking for retinal detachment.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

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