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  Indian J Med Microbiol
 

Figure 3: (a) Normal trabecular meshwork, × 3.0K. Each cylindrical uveal trabecular beam is distinct, with generally smooth endothelial surfaces, and some cellular borders visible (thin arrows). Large intertrabecular spaces are present. Melanin granules, (thick arrow), can be seen on the cells and within the spaces. (b) Acute PACG eye × 3.0K; 65-year-old female, highest IOP recorded 54 mm Hg. The swollen endothelial cells show an irregular surface with numerous macrophages, (dashed arrow), and an accumulation of pigment granules in an amorphous deposit (full arrow). (c) Chronic PACG eye × 3.0K; 57-year-old male, baseline IOP of 36 mm Hg. Few widened uveal trabeculae with a knotted appearance are visible. The knotted appearance appears to be due to the presence of nuclei of the endothelial cells in some places, and in others due to the localized accumulation of amorphous material (thick arrow). Other trabecular beams can be seen within a homogenous deposit (thin arrow), with few spaces or corneoscleral trabeculae visible. (d) POAG eye × 3.0K; 67-year-old male, highest baseline IOP 28 mmHg. There are flat and widened uveal trabeculae, beneath which corneoscleral trabeculae and spaces are seen. Fewer spaces are visible cf control eyes. Fused trabeculae can be seen (thick arrow). RBC (thin arrow), melanin granules and debris are seen on the surface

Figure 3: (a) Normal trabecular meshwork, × 3.0K. Each cylindrical uveal trabecular beam is distinct, with generally smooth endothelial surfaces, and some cellular borders visible (thin arrows). Large intertrabecular spaces are present. Melanin granules, (thick arrow), can be seen on the cells and within the spaces. (b) Acute PACG eye × 3.0K; 65-year-old female, highest IOP recorded 54 mm Hg. The swollen endothelial cells show an irregular surface with numerous macrophages, (dashed arrow), and an accumulation of pigment granules in an amorphous deposit (full arrow). (c) Chronic PACG eye × 3.0K; 57-year-old male, baseline IOP of 36 mm Hg. Few widened uveal trabeculae with a knotted appearance are visible. The knotted appearance appears to be due to the presence of nuclei of the endothelial cells in some places, and in others due to the localized accumulation of amorphous material (thick arrow). Other trabecular beams can be seen within a homogenous deposit (thin arrow), with few spaces or corneoscleral trabeculae visible. (d) POAG eye × 3.0K; 67-year-old male, highest baseline IOP 28 mmHg. There are flat and widened uveal trabeculae, beneath which corneoscleral trabeculae and spaces are seen. Fewer spaces are visible cf control eyes. Fused trabeculae can be seen (thick arrow). RBC (thin arrow), melanin granules and debris are seen on the surface