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CASE REPORT
Year : 1982  |  Volume : 30  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 61-62

A rare complication of pterygium


Senior Consultant Guinness Ophthalmic Unit Ahmadu Bello University Hospital P. M.B. 2016 Kaduna, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Chakko Puthenpurayil Thommy
Senior Consultant Guinness Ophthalmic Unit Ahmadu Bello University Hospital P.M.B. 2016 Kaduna
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 7141590

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How to cite this article:
Thommy CP. A rare complication of pterygium. Indian J Ophthalmol 1982;30:61-2

How to cite this URL:
Thommy CP. A rare complication of pterygium. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 1982 [cited 2021 Jun 23];30:61-2. Available from: https://www.ijo.in/text.asp?1982/30/1/61/27945

Apart from causing local corneal ulcera­tion, no reactions seems to occur from insec­ts[1],[2] However, Duke-Elder[3] considers body fluids of insects can cause superficial reac­tions on the cornea and conjunctiva as well as the lids.

In the case reported here, the insect caused a corneal ulcer, infiltration involving all the layers of the cornea, and a uveal reaction lodging itself in the shelf formed by upper fold of pterygium.


  Case report Top


A 45 year-old male (D.J.) was diagonsed as a medial pterygium in the left eye. He was posted for pterygium excision two weeks later. The day before surgery it was noticed that the pterygium was congested as was also the adjacent conjunctiva. There was also a ciliary flush in a sector shaped manner between the pterygium and the 12 O'clock position. On slit lamp examination, a dark brown insect could be made out in the shelf formed by ; the upper fold of the pterygium at the corneal end. The insect was removed. The site occupied by the insect had become a staining corneal ulcer. Moreover, there was a corneal infiltration involving all the layers spreading in-wards. Descemet's folds could be seen radiating from the ulcer area. There were a few keratic precipitates on the endothelium where the corneal infiltration was. A mode­rate acqueous flare was present. The ulcer healed promptly on usual treat­ment leaving a facet or pit which was gradually invaded by blood vessels in a month's time. As the ulcer started healing, a subconjuncti­val injection of depot steroid was given and a short course of systemic steroid instituted to control the inflammation which was otherwise not subsiding. After the inflammation subsi­ded, the infiltrated area was opaque involving all layers. The pterygium was excised and beta irradiated after 2 months. The post ope­rative period was uneventful. [Figure - 1].


  Discussion Top


This rare incidence of an insect getting lodged in the upper fold of a pterygium would indicate another area to be searched for a foreign body similar to the superior tarsal sulcus. Indeed the upper fold of a large growing pterygium forms a considerable poten­tial space for a foreign body to get lodged. An insect because of its secretions can set up a reaction in the conjunctiva, the cornea and the endothelium and the Iris. Serious visual impairment may result if the condition is not recognised early and treatment instituted.


  Summary Top


An insect getting lodged in the shelf formed by the upper fold of a pterygium has not been reported. This case illustrates the possibility of such an occurrence. It caused a corneal ulcer, infiltration involving all layers of the cornea, and a uveal reaction.

 
  References Top

1.
Grant, W.M., 1979, In Toxicology of the eye 2nd ed. Illinois Charles C. Thomas p. 579.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Zauberman, H., and Neumann, E, 1965, Amer. J. Ophthalmol. 60 :467.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Duke-Elder, S., And MacFaul, P.A, 1972, Injuries, In System of Ophthalmology Vol. XIV Part 2, London Henry Kimpton p. 1346.  Back to cited text no. 3
    


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