Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 1510
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page

   Table of Contents      
CASE REPORT
Year : 1982  |  Volume : 30  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 111-112

Osteomyelits of the supra orbital margin


Eye Hospital Aligarh, India

Correspondence Address:
Gopal Krishna
Eye Hospital Aligarh
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 7141595

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Krishna G. Osteomyelits of the supra orbital margin. Indian J Ophthalmol 1982;30:111-2

How to cite this URL:
Krishna G. Osteomyelits of the supra orbital margin. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 1982 [cited 2020 Nov 24];30:111-2. Available from: https://www.ijo.in/text.asp?1982/30/2/111/28091

Osteomyelitis of the Supra Orbital Margin is not a common condition. Osteomyelitis is usually present in children and young female adult under the age of 30 years. The common causes of supra orbital margin osteomyelitis ale trauma, and as a complication of chronic sinusitis. In majority of cases staphylococcus aureus was found responsible for this condi­tion. Other bacteria such as Streptococcus Pneumoniae and Hemophilus influenzae are also the causative organism of the frontal bone osteomyelitis[1],[2],[3],[4]

In the present case ptosis of the left upper lid associated with osteomyelitis of Supra Orbital Margin has been reported.


  Case report Top


A 26 year married female R. S. reported with the complaints of drooping of the left upper lid for 12 months with a thick pus discharge from the upper lid sinus, follow­ing trauma of the left orbital margin by the stone. On examination of the left eye, there was sinus in the upper lid just below the junction of the medial 1 /3 and lateral 2/3 of the left supra orbital margins [Figure - 1]. There were granulation tissues at the mouth of the sinus. The adjacent area of sinus was tender.

The upper lid shows ptosis with restricted movements of levator palpebrae superioris. The extra ocular muscles show normal function. The upper bulbar and palpebral conjunctivae show chemosis and hyperemia.

The posterior segment of the eye ball was normal. The visual acuity was 6/6 in both eyes. The right eye was normal.

On laboratory investigation, the culture and sensitivity of the pus shows pseudomonas which was sensitive to Gentamicin (Garamy­cin).

The X-Rays of orbital margins shows sequestrum with destruction of adjacent bone in left supra orbital margin.

The patient was given injection of garamy­cin (160 mg. daily) for 10 days. After subsi­dence of inflammation and pus discharge the infected cavity was saucerized with the removal of sequestrum and subcutaneous tissue adhesion.

After 15 days, the levator palpebrae superioris starts regaining function and after 2 months the recovery of the ptosis is completed with normal functioning levator palpebrae superioris.


  Discussion Top


Osteomyelitis of the supra orbital margin with sequestrum is not a common condition.

The mechanical ptosis in this case is due to the adhesions between the levator and sub­cutaneous tissue and pressure on the levator due to local oedema and inflammatory infiltrates.

The cases of mechanical ptosis, due to sinus disorders were reported by Dejean[5]. Gazaniol[6] and Wolff & Juler[7]. In 1921 Comberg reported a case of mechanical ptosis due to inflammatory infiltrates.

The patient shows recovery with sauceriza­tion operation and antibiotic.


  Summary Top


A case of the upper lid ptosis associated with traumatic osteomyelitis of supra orbital margin of the frontal bone has been reported.


  Acknowledgements Top


I am thankful to Dr. Gyan Prakash, .E.N.T. Surgeon, Dr. S.K. Jain, consultant pathologist and Dr. Gyan P. Lal. consultant Radiologist for their help in this case.[8]

 
  References Top

1.
Hall, T.S. and Colman, B.H., 1973, Diseases of the nose, throat and ear, E.L.B.S. and Churchill. Livingstone. Great Britain. 10th ed. p 96.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Montgomery, W., 1969, Disease of the nose, throat and ear Ed. Ballenger, JJ. Lea and Febiger, Philadelphia, 11th ed. p 173.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Rege, S.R., Shah, K.L. and Kantawala, S.A., 1972, Ind. J. Ophthalmol. Vol. No. 3, Sept., p 96.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Stewait, J.P. ed, 19E8, Longan Turner's Diseases of the nose, throat and ear, Varghese India. 7th ed. p 106.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Dejean, 1927, Cited by Duke Elder, 1952, Text Book of Ophthalmology, Vol. V. Henry Kimptom, London, p 5137.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Gazaniol, 1929, Cited by Duke Eider 1952, Text Book of Ophthalmology, Vol. V, Henry Kimptom, London, p 5137.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Wolff and Juler, 1932, Cited by Duke Elder, 1952, Text Bcok of Ophthalmology, Vol. V, Henry Kimptom, London, p 5137.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Comberg, 1921, cited by Duke Elder, 1952, Text Book of Ophthalmology, V, Henry Kimptom, London, p 5137.  Back to cited text no. 8
    


    Figures

  [Figure - 1]



 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
Case report
Discussion
Summary
Acknowledgements
References
Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1782    
    Printed37    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded0    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal