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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 68  |  Issue : 10  |  Page : 2190-2195

Topical lambda-cyhalothrin in reducing eye oscillations in a canine model of infantile nystagmus syndrome


1 Akron Children's Hospital, Akron, OH, Primary Place Work Completed; SUMMA Medical Center; Akron, OH, Northeast Ohio Medical College, Rootstown, OH, USA
2 The Daroff-Dell'Osso Ocular Motility Lab, LSC VA Medical Center and Departments of Neurology and Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA
3 Akron Children's Hospital, Akron, OH, Primary Place Work Completed; Akron, OH, Northeast Ohio Medical College, Rootstown, OH, USA
4 SUMMA Medical Center; Akron, OH, Northeast Ohio Medical College, Rootstown, OH, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Richard W Hertle
300 Locust Street, Suite 490, Akron OH 44302
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_586_20

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Purpose: To determine the ocular and systemic safety of using topical Lambda-Cyhalothrin (LCL) in a canine model of infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS). The rationale for this proposal is based on a case study of a patient whose INS improved after inadvertent ocular exposure to a pyrethroid pesticide containing LCL. Methods: After in-vitro safety testing and IUCAC approval, we studied increasing concentrations of topical LCL drops (0.002% to 0.07%) in canines with a purposely bred defect in the RPE65 gene resulting in both retinal degeneration and INS. We collected data on ocular and systemic effects and performed eye-movement recordings (EMR). Results: At the 0.07% concentration dose of LCL, there was minimal, reversible, conjunctival hyperemia. There was no other ocular or systemic toxicity. At the 0.06% dose, there was a visible decrease in the INS and EMR showed a 153%–240% increase in the nystagmus acuity function and a 30%–70% decrease in amplitude across gaze. There was also a 40%–60% decrease in intraocular pressure while on the drop in both eyes. Conclusion: This animal study suggests this new pharmacological agent has potential for topical treatment of both INS and diseases with raised intraocular pressure. Further, this new treatment approach confirms the importance of extraocular muscle proprioception in ocular motor diseases and their treatment.


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