Indian Journal of Ophthalmology

ARTICLES
Year
: 1981  |  Volume : 29  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 147--149

Evaluation of catalin, succus cineraria maritima and catobell in goat lens cultures


MV Albal1, AG Chandorkar2, PM Bulakh3,  
1 Department of Ophthalmology, Dr. V.M. Medical College, Solapur, India
2 Department of Pharmacology, Dr. V.M. Medical College, Solapur, India
3 Department of Biochemistry, Dr. V.M. Medical College, Solapur, India

Correspondence Address:
A G Chandorkar
Department of Pharmacology, Dr. V.M. Medical College, Solapur 413 003
India




How to cite this article:
Albal M V, Chandorkar A G, Bulakh P M. Evaluation of catalin, succus cineraria maritima and catobell in goat lens cultures.Indian J Ophthalmol 1981;29:147-149


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Albal M V, Chandorkar A G, Bulakh P M. Evaluation of catalin, succus cineraria maritima and catobell in goat lens cultures. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 1981 [cited 2024 Mar 2 ];29:147-149
Available from: https://journals.lww.com/ijo/pages/default.aspx/text.asp?1981/29/3/147/30867


Full Text

Lens organ culture a newly developed tech�nique by Haddad et al[1] for evaluating drugs acting on the eye was employed by us with some modifications to evaluate the anticataract effects of three commonly available drugs, used in treatment of senile cataracts and other lenti�cular opacities viz. Catalin (Biddle - Sawyer), Succus Cineraria maritima (Schwabe) and Catobell (Bell Pharma). The effect of these drugs were also studied in lenses exposed to serially increased concentrations of glucose and galactose in the media fluid.

 MATERIALS AND METHODS



Goat lenses were obtained from the freshly frozen eye balls transported immediately from the slaughter house. They were disected out carefully and placed in a sterile tissue culture dish having a coloured nylon net, partly sub�merged in a saline solution, which is isotonic with aqueous humour, having the following constituents in gm/liter 3.

Sodium chloride 7.8

Disodium hydrogen phosphate 0.106

Potassium chloride 0.375

Ascorbic acid 0.193

Sodium-bicarbonate 2.520

Glucose 0.990

pH was carefully adjusted and maintained at 7.8. Room temperature varied between 27� -29� C. Saline was changed at fixed intervals. Lenses were observed for development of generalised haziness or opacities, intumescence, disruption and other morphological changes. Dry weights were also recorded. Transparancy was measured by observing the number and characteristics of squares seen through the lens. Changes were noted visually and recorded photographically.

Glucose or galactose was added to the culture media in such a way that it did not change the proportionate concentration of other constituents nor it changed the pH of the fluid or the volume. The concentrations used were those which caused an increase of 50,100 and 200% over the normal. Thus probably simulating an increase in blood sugar level in diabetic patients, reflected probably in the same proportion in the ocular tissues.

Lenses were exposed to anticataract agents, Catalin, Succus Cineraria maritima and Cato�bell ophthalmic solutions, added to the media to get 1:1000 and 1:100 dilutions. Quantities were adjusted in such way that niether the pH, nor the volume of media fluid changed signifi�cantly. Media was changed at fixed intervals. Effect of drug was compared with a simulta�neously run control in identical conditions.

 OBSERVATIONS



The normal lens [Figure 1] could be maintai�ned for a period varying from 5 to 7 days in the above solution at room temperature. The ear�liest change observed was an opacity startint peripherally and sometimes along with a central cataract as well, usually seen at the end of 36 hrs or more [Figure 2]. The lens ther showed swelling or intumuscence which can be detected by the thickening and distoratior of lines of the squares and reduction in their number [Figure 3]. As the opacities became pro�minent, the lens became gradually transluscent and subsquently opaque by the end of 72 hr. [Figure 4].

Lenses started disrupting and lens fibers started separating after 72 hr. and by the end of 120 hr. (5th day) it disintegrated into two or 3 petals [Figure 5] and the experiment had to be terminated by removing the lenses from the media fluid. It was observed that when the lenses were exposed to serial concentration of glucose or galactose added to the aqueous media, it hastended the onset of development of opacities by 12-24 hrs and reduced the via�bility from 5-7 days to 3-4 days. An increased swelling or intumescence (at 24-36 hrs) with increase in the weight of the lens (0.5 to 1 gm) and early disruption (72 hrs) was also observed.

Addition of anticataract agents, Catalin, Succus Cineraria maritima and Catobell in con�centration of 1:1000 and 1:100 delayed the development of opacities by 12-24 hours, their relative potency being in the following order, Catalin, Succus Cineraria maritima and Cato�bel, in normal lenses and to a lesser extent in (from 12-18 hours) media containing higher concentrations of either glucose or galactose. The increase in concentration of these agents from 1:1000 to 1:100, however, did not signi�ficantly effect the course of development of lenticular opacities or cataractous process.

 DISCUSSION



Our results indicate that all these three agents claimed to have anticataract properties, though delay the loss of transparancy of the lenses and increase their viability in the normal lens, do not have any significant effect in earlier cataractous changes induced by addition of increased concentrations of glucose and galactose to the culture media.

As their mechanism of action in cataracts is not clearly and definitely established, it would be interesting to study their effects on various lens proteins, tryptophar and other meta�bolites, lens polyols, and on enzymes and isoenzymes responsible for maintenance of physiological state and functions of the lens. Studies in these direction are being undertaken.

 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT



Authors are thankful to the Dean, Dr. V.M. Medical College, Solapur for the facilities given to undertake this work, and to Shivaji University, Kolhapur for financial support.[3]

References

1Haddad H.M., Shore, B., and Fuman, M., 1967, Amer. J. Ophthal mol. 63: 1731.
2Iwata, S., 1976, Acta Sixth Afro-Asian Congress, of Ophthalmology, Madras.
3Mathur, S.P., 1976, Acta Sixth Afro-Asian Cong�ress, Ophthalmol. Page 192.