Indian Journal of Ophthalmology

BRIEF REPORT
Year
: 1988  |  Volume : 36  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 37--40

A comparative study of ibuprofen with paracetamol versus oxyphenbutazone with analgin combination in ophthalmic practice


IS Roy, Amitava Das, Minakshi Roy 
 Professor and Director; Regional Institute of Ophthalmology, Calcutta-700 073, India

Correspondence Address:
I S Roy
Professor and Director; Regional Institute of Ophthalmology, Calcutta-700 073
India

Abstract

A total of 200 patients of either sex with various ophthalmic inflammatory disorders of surgical and non-surgical types were treated with ibuprofen with paracetamol 1 tablet tid. or a combination of oxyphenbutazone and analgin-1 tablet t. i. d. for 7 days/ Patients in the ibuprofen with Paracetamol group recorded a signifi­cantly greater reduction in pain scores; on day 1 and 2 and in swelling scores on day 2, 5 and 7 as compared to patients receiving the combination of ox yphenbutazone and analgin. A significantly lesserr number of patients in the ibuprofen with paraeetamol group required escape analgesics. Seventy six per cent of patients in the Ibuprofen with paracetamol group were judged as showing a Very good - Good, response to treatment as against 55 per cent in the oxvphenbutazone­analgin group. It is concluded that ibuprofen with Paracetamol is superior in efficacy and a safer alternative to a combination of oxyphenbutazone and analgin.



How to cite this article:
Roy I S, Das A, Roy M. A comparative study of ibuprofen with paracetamol versus oxyphenbutazone with analgin combination in ophthalmic practice.Indian J Ophthalmol 1988;36:37-40


How to cite this URL:
Roy I S, Das A, Roy M. A comparative study of ibuprofen with paracetamol versus oxyphenbutazone with analgin combination in ophthalmic practice. Indian J Ophthalmol [serial online] 1988 [cited 2022 Jan 21 ];36:37-40
Available from: https://www.ijo.in/text.asp?1988/36/1/37/26164


Full Text

 Introduction



Ocular inflammation is not uncommon after ocular surgery, trauma or due to systemic or local causes. Though topical or systemic steroids are important anti­-inflammatory agents by virtue of their potency, non­steroidal anti- inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are also widely used for the symptomatic relief of ophthalmic inflammatory disorders The analgesic action of NSAIDs however, is indirect arising out of their anti-inflamma­tory action [1], and it may take a few days to weeks for them to exert their full therapeutic effcetz. The need to combine simple analgesics along with NSAIDs for the relief of acute pain is, therefore, frequently felt by the physician.

The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy and safety of two NSAID analgesic combinations one a combination of ibuprofen and paracetamol and the other a combination of oxyphenbutazone and analgin, in the management of inflammatory disorders in ophthalmic practice.

 Materials and Methods



A randomised comparative study of two parallel groups of patients, one receiving Ibuprofen with Paracetamol and the other a comination of oxyphenbutazone and analgin was undertaken at the Regional Institute of Ophthalmology, Calcutta from I st August 1986 to 31 st December 1986. A total of200 adult patients of either sex suffering from various painful inflammatory ophthal­mic disorders of surgical or non- surgical types requiring therapy with an anti- inflammatory agent qualified for inclusion in the study. Patients already receiving systemic corticosteroids or anti-inflammatory or anal­gesic drugs and also those suffering from peptic dis­orders were excluded from the study. A complete case history was obtained from every patient and a thorough physical examination performed, both systemic and local. The clinical diagnosis was noted, and the present­ing signs and symptoms such as pain, swelling and congestion were graded on a scale of 0-3 as follows : 0= absent 1 = mild; 2 = moderate and 3 = severe.

Appropriate investigations (eg. biochemistry, bacterio­logy, etc) were carried out as necessary. Patients were randomly assigned to either of the two treatment groups of 100, each one (Gr. A) receiving Ibuprofen with Paracetamol l tablet t i d and the other (Gr. B) 1 tablet of a combination of oxyphenbutazone and analgin t i d for 7 days. Other appropriate treatment such as antibiotics administered to the patient was recorded Topical steroids were administered in appropriate cases; If pain control was inadequate, escape analgesics (ie. paraceta­mol tablets) were administered but were recorded as a negative indication of analgesic activity. The local signs a week as mentioned above and subsequently after two weeks. The occurrence of side effects, if any, was noted and an overall assessment of therapy on a scale of Very good- Poor was made at the end of the treatment period.

Results

[Table 1] gives the non-surgical and surgical cases of ophthalmic inflammatory disorders included in the study. The distribution of cases in the two treatment groups was comparable.

[Table 2] gives the- improvement in the various sign/symptom scores in the two treatment groups. Both treatment modes resulted in a significant reduction in the sign/symptom scores by day 1. Patients in the Ibuprofen with Paracetamol group recorded a significantly greater reduction in pain scores on day 1 and 2 [Table 2] and in swelling scores on day 2, 5 and 7 as compared to patients receiving the combination of oxyphenbutazone and analgin. The reduction in the congestion in the two treatment groups was comparable though patients in the Ibuprofen with Paracetamol group recorded a slightly higher mean reduction.

[Table 3] gives the number of patients requiring escape analgesics in the two treatment groups and the overall response to treatment Only 3 patients in the Ibuprofen with Paracetamol group as against 14 in the oxyphen­butazone-analgin group required escape analgesics denoting poor pain control. This difference was highly significant A total of 18 patients in the Ibuprofen with Paracetamol group and 46 patients in the oxyphenbuta­zone-analgin group complained of gastric irritation with treatment This difference was also highly signi­ficant (P 2 test).

Seventy six patients in the Ibuprofen with Paracetanol group showed very good to good response to treatment as against 55 in the Oxyphenbutazone-analgin group. Only 9 patients in the Ibuprofen with Paracetamol group as against 17 in the Oxyphenbutazone-analgin group showed a poor response. All differences between groups were highly significant at P [2],[5],[6],[7]. Propionic acid derivatives, on the other hand, have a low incidence of adverse effects and ibuprofen in particular is better tolerated than aspirin, indomethacin or phenylbutazone [8].

Regarding the choice of a simple analgesic to be com­bined with ibuprofen, the well established safety of paracetamoll [2,9] and its pharmacokinetic compatibility with ibuprofen makes it eminently suited for this purpose. Such a combination of ibuprofen with parace­tamol/has been shown to be superior in efficacy to ibuprofen in acute painful inflammatory disorders in rheumatology and dentistry [10],[11],[12]. A similar superior effi­cacy and tolerance of Ibuprofen with Paracetamol over a combination of oxyphenbutazone and analgin was demonstrated in our present study.

It is concluded that Ibuprofen with Paracetamol is superior in efficacy and a safer alternative to a combina­tion of Oxyphenbutazone and analgin in the manage­ment of inflammatory ophthalmic disorders of surgical and non-surgical types.

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